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A Virologist looks at an electron microscope image of a MERS coronavirus, a close relative of the novel coronavirus, on Jan. 24. Photo: Arne Dedert/picture alliance via Getty Images

Two Floridians have died after testing positive for the novel coronavirus following international travel, the state health department said on Saturday.

What's happening: Two new presumptive positive COVID-19 cases were also announced in Florida on Saturday — the Broward County residents, a 75-year-old man and a 65-year-old man, are in isolation after testing positive for the virus in a state lab, with additional CDC confirmation pending.

Why it matters: There are now 19 reported deaths from the virus in the U.S., with most — 16 — located in Washington state, per data from Johns Hopkins and state health departments.

Details: One deceased Florida patient was a Santa Rose County resident, and the other a Lee County resident, per the department's press release.

By the numbers: 11 Florida residents have tested positive for COVID-19, along with five repatriated citizens and one non-resident in the state, per the state health department. 278 patients are being monitored and 87 results are pending.

What we don't know: The health department has not disclosed the deceased patients' ages or genders or identified if the new presumptive positive cases were caused by international travel or community spread.

  • The health department did not indicate in its statement on Saturday where the deceased patients had traveled to or if officials were attempting to determine who they came in contact with.
  • The Florida health department did not immediately respond to request for comment. Multiple responders on the state's COVID-19 call center hotline declined to comment on the record.

What you can do: Florida residents are advised to avoid close contact with those who are sick, wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands and covering your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze.

The big picture: Organizers canceled the AFL-CIO presidential forum, at which 2020 candidates Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders were due to speak on Thursday, because of concerns about the virus outbreak.

Go deeper... Coronavirus updates: More than 100 countries report cases

Editor's note: This article has been updated with new details throughout.

Go deeper

Scoop: Border officials project 13,000 child migrants in May

The "El Chaparral" border crossing at Tijuana. Photo: Stringer/Picture Alliance via Getty Images

A Customs and Border Protection staffer told top administration officials Thursday the agency is projecting a peak of 13,000 unaccompanied children crossing the border in May, sources directly familiar with the discussion told Axios.

Why it matters: That projection would exceed the height of the 2019 crisis, which led to the infamous "kids-in-cages" disaster. It also underscores a rapidly escalating crisis for the Biden administration.

1 hour ago - World

U.S. strikes Iran-backed militia facilities in Syria

President Biden at the Pentagon on Feb. 10. Photo: Alex Brandon - Pool/Getty Images

The United States on Thursday carried out an airstrike against facilities in Syria linked to an Iran-backed militia group, the Pentagon announced.

The state of play: The strike, approved by President Biden, comes "in response to recent attacks against American and Coalition personnel in Iraq, and to ongoing threats to those personnel," Pentagon press secretary John Kirby said in a statement.

Senate parliamentarian rules $15 minimum wage cannot be included in relief package

Photo: Al Drago/Getty Images

The Senate parliamentarian ruled Thursday that the provision to increase the minimum wage to $15/hour cannot be included in the broader $1.9 trillion COVID relief package.

Why it matters: It's now very likely that any increase in the minimum wage will need bipartisan support, as the provision cannot be passed with the simple Senate majority that Democrats are aiming to use for President Biden's rescue bill.