Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

School district officials have closed Jackson High School for three days of cleaning after a student, who did not recently travel to any countries affected the COVID-19, coronavirus, tested positive for the virus. Photo: David Ryder/Getty Images

A patient in Washington state has died after contracting the novel coronavirus, state health officials told reporters in call with the CDC on Saturday.

The latest: Dr. Jeffrey Duchin, public health officer for Seattle and King County, said the deceased patient was "a man in his 50s who had underlying health conditions." State officials reported two new patients who are presumed to have contracted the coronavirus: a 70-year-old woman who is a resident of a long-term care facility and a 40-year-old female health care worker from the same facility with no known travel outside of the U.S.

  • The deceased patient was not associated with the Life Care Center of Kirkland that the other two newly announced cases are involved with, officials said

Why it matters: This marks the first virus-related death in the U.S. amid an outbreak that has exceeded 85,000 confirmed cases around the world.

What we know: There are now two additional presumptive positive coronavirus cases in Washington state, after state health officials identified on Friday a 50-year-old woman from King County and a person under the age of 18 in Snohomish County with no travel history who was infected by unknown means.

  • The two new patients announced on Saturday are currently hospitalized. The 70-year-old woman is in "serious condition," Duchin said, while the 40-year-old is in fair condition.
  • The 50-year-old woman had a travel history to Daegu, South Korea, and was under home isolation as of Friday, per state health officials.
  • The underage patient visited Seattle Children’s North Clinic on Monday, officials said, and the state health department is working to "ensure the safety of students and staff at Jackson High School, where this student attends."
  • Both patients identified on Friday were in home isolation, officials said.

What to watch: Duchin told reporters that there are more than 108 residents at the long-term care facility where the affected 70-year-old woman was staying, and 180 staff members. He said that approximately 25 staff members have exhibited symptoms including respiratory symptoms and pneumonia, while roughly 27 residents have done the same.

  • A CDC team will arrive at the facility on Saturday night to assess all staff and residents at the facility, he said.

The big picture: Four presumptive positive cases of the coronavirus were announced Friday evening across the western U.S., per the CDC. Three patients in California, Oregon and Washington state were infected by unknown means, the CDC said, while the fourth case was said to be likely travel related.

What they're saying: "Additional cases in the U.S. are likely, but healthy individuals should be able to fully recover and we think that will be a statement we can make with great surety now that we've gotten familiar with this problem. They should be able to recover should they contract the virus," Trump said at a White House press briefing on Saturday.

  • "There's no reason to panic, at all," he added.

This is a breaking story. Please check back for updates.

Go deeper... Coronavirus updates: CDC monitoring 4 presumptive positive cases in western U.S.

Go deeper

Off the Rails

Episode 7: Trump turns on Pence

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photos: Elijah Nouvelage, Alex Wong/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. Axios takes you inside the collapse of a president with a special series.

Episode 7: Trump turns on Pence. Trump believes the vice president can solve all his problems by simply refusing to certify the Electoral College results. It's a simple test of loyalty: Trump or the U.S. Constitution.

"The end is coming, Donald."

The male voice in the TV ad boomed through the White House residence during "Fox & Friends" commercial breaks. Over and over and over. "The end is coming, Donald. ... On Jan. 6, Mike Pence will put the nail in your political coffin."

Big Tech's post-riot reckoning

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

The Capitol insurrection means the anti-tech talk in Washington is more likely to lead to action, since it's ever clearer that the attack was planned, at least in part, on social media.

Why it matters: The big platforms may have hoped they'd move to D.C.'s back burner, with the Hill focused on the Biden agenda and the pandemic out of control. But now, there'll be no escaping harsh scrutiny.

27 mins ago - Technology

Why domestic terrorists are so hard to police online

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Domestic terrorism has proven to be more difficult for Big Tech companies to police online than foreign terrorism.

The big picture: That's largely because the politics are harder. There's more unity around the need to go after foreign extremists than domestic ones — and less danger of overreaching and provoking a backlash.