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School district officials have closed Jackson High School for three days of cleaning after a student, who did not recently travel to any countries affected the COVID-19, coronavirus, tested positive for the virus. Photo: David Ryder/Getty Images

A patient in Washington state has died after contracting the novel coronavirus, state health officials told reporters in call with the CDC on Saturday.

The latest: Dr. Jeffrey Duchin, public health officer for Seattle and King County, said the deceased patient was "a man in his 50s who had underlying health conditions." State officials reported two new patients who are presumed to have contracted the coronavirus: a 70-year-old woman who is a resident of a long-term care facility and a 40-year-old female health care worker from the same facility with no known travel outside of the U.S.

  • The deceased patient was not associated with the Life Care Center of Kirkland that the other two newly announced cases are involved with, officials said

Why it matters: This marks the first virus-related death in the U.S. amid an outbreak that has exceeded 85,000 confirmed cases around the world.

What we know: There are now two additional presumptive positive coronavirus cases in Washington state, after state health officials identified on Friday a 50-year-old woman from King County and a person under the age of 18 in Snohomish County with no travel history who was infected by unknown means.

  • The two new patients announced on Saturday are currently hospitalized. The 70-year-old woman is in "serious condition," Duchin said, while the 40-year-old is in fair condition.
  • The 50-year-old woman had a travel history to Daegu, South Korea, and was under home isolation as of Friday, per state health officials.
  • The underage patient visited Seattle Children’s North Clinic on Monday, officials said, and the state health department is working to "ensure the safety of students and staff at Jackson High School, where this student attends."
  • Both patients identified on Friday were in home isolation, officials said.

What to watch: Duchin told reporters that there are more than 108 residents at the long-term care facility where the affected 70-year-old woman was staying, and 180 staff members. He said that approximately 25 staff members have exhibited symptoms including respiratory symptoms and pneumonia, while roughly 27 residents have done the same.

  • A CDC team will arrive at the facility on Saturday night to assess all staff and residents at the facility, he said.

The big picture: Four presumptive positive cases of the coronavirus were announced Friday evening across the western U.S., per the CDC. Three patients in California, Oregon and Washington state were infected by unknown means, the CDC said, while the fourth case was said to be likely travel related.

What they're saying: "Additional cases in the U.S. are likely, but healthy individuals should be able to fully recover and we think that will be a statement we can make with great surety now that we've gotten familiar with this problem. They should be able to recover should they contract the virus," Trump said at a White House press briefing on Saturday.

  • "There's no reason to panic, at all," he added.

This is a breaking story. Please check back for updates.

Go deeper... Coronavirus updates: CDC monitoring 4 presumptive positive cases in western U.S.

Go deeper

Updated 53 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Trump sues New York Times and his niece over tax report

Former President Trump hosting a boxing match in Hollywood, Florida on Sept. 11. Photo: Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Former President Trump filed a $100 million lawsuit against the New York Times and his niece Mary Trump on Tuesday over the news outlet's 2018 reporting on his tax records, the Daily Beast first reported.

Details: The suit, filed in New York's Dutchess County, alleges NYT journalists "engaged in an insidious plot to obtain confidential and highly-sensitive records" and that they "convinced" Mary Trump to "smuggle records out of her attorney's office and turn them over to The Times."

Brazil's health minister tests positive for COVID during UN summit in N.Y.

President of Brazil Jair Bolsonaro (L) and Health Minister Marcelo Queiroga in Brasilia, Brazil, in May. Photo: Andressa Anholete/Getty Images

Brazil's Health Minister Marcelo Queirog has tested positive for COVID-19 while in New York City for the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA), he confirmed Tuesday night.

Why it matters: Hours earlier, Queirog had accompanied Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro to the UNGA. The Biden administration expressed concern last week that the gathering of world leaders could become a coronavirus "superspreader event."

House passes government funding, debt ceiling bill

Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Photo by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

The House passed a bill on Tuesday to fund the government through early December, along with a measure to raise the debt ceiling through December 2022.

Why it matters: The stopgap measure, which needs to be passed to avoid a government shutdown when funding expires on Sept. 30, faces a difficult journey in the Senate where at least ten Republicans would need to vote in favor.