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Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

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Photo by Paul Bersebach/MediaNews Group/Orange County Register via Getty Images

Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) officials said Tuesday the agency is changing its policy on funding personal protective equipment, per a recording of a conference call obtained by NPR.

Why it matters: The new policy, effective Sept. 15., means that states will no longer be reimbursed for cloth face masks unless they're for emergency protective measures. This impacts schools, public housing, and courthouses, according to NPR.

Details: "Supporting schools and other functions ... are not a direct emergency protective measures and therefore they're not eligible for [Public Assistance]," said Keith Turi, FEMA assistant administrator for recovery, according to the recording.

  • In response to a state government official from the Midwest seeking clarification on PPE for teachers, Turi said that they "are not eligible because they are related to the operating of facilities."
"There are costs that being incurred and required based on COVID, but they are all not necessarily emergency protective measures, and they're not necessarily all FEMA-eligible."

Of note: "FEMA said it will still provide personal protective equipment, including cloth face masks, for medical care, some medical sheltering, mass casualty management and other settings," according to NPR.

  • The announcement comes as about half of school districts in the U.S. prepare return to school buildings in the fall. Per Axios' Kim Hart, most big-city school districts that serve large numbers of at-risk students will continue with remote learning for the foreseeable future.

The big picture: Under President Trump's national emergency declaration for the novel coronavirus, state and local authorities can apply to be refunded costs for measures taken to respond to the pandemic.

What they're saying: FEMA said in a statement to Axios that the agency released an interim policy to clarify eligible work under the Public Assistance program as part of Trump's March declaration.

  • "Reimbursement for the purchase and distribution of disinfecting supplies for schools is only eligible when being used in the performance of an eligible emergency protective measure," according to the statement.
  • "Normal operation of schools and other public facilities are not emergency protective measures, so FEMA would not provide funding for these activities in these circumstances."
  • It said states, territories and tribes could still seek federal assistance for these items via FEMA’s PA program, the Treasury's Coronavirus Relief Fund and schools funding administered by the Education Department.

Go deeper

Dec 11, 2020 - Health

Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Virginia announce new COVID-19 restrictions

Health care workers put on personal protective equipment before people arrive at a drive through testing site for coronavirus in Arlington, Virginia. Photo: Andrew Caballero/AFP via Getty Images

Governors in Oklahoma, Pennsylvania and Virginia announced fresh coronavirus restrictions for their states on Thursday as the number of cases across the U.S. climbs.

Driving the news: The U.S. recorded 221,267 COVID-19 cases on Wednesday and a record 3,124 deaths, per Johns Hopkins University data.

The hurdles we face before reaching herd immunity

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Once 75%–80% of people get vaccinated against the coronavirus, there should be strong enough herd immunity that we can return to normal activities, NIAID director Anthony Fauci tells Axios.

Driving the news: The FDA is meeting with outside experts today as the agency considers granting an emergency use authorization to Pfizer-BioNTech for their COVID-19 vaccine. A similar meeting is slated for next week to discuss a vaccine developed by Moderna.

Updated 11 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Brendan Lynch/Axios

  1. Health: Coronavirus cases aren't budging — even after vaccinations doubled— Health care workers feel stress, burnout more than a year into the pandemic — Handful of "breakthrough" COVID cases occurred in nursing homes, CDC says.
  2. Vaccines: Johnson & Johnson's vaccine production problems look even bigger — All U.S. adults now eligible for COVID-19 vaccine.
  3. Political: Watchdog says agency infighting increased health and safety risks at start of pandemic.
  4. World: EU regulator: Benefits of J&J vaccine outweigh risk of rare blood clots.
  5. Variant tracker: Where different strains are spreading.