Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Jason Alden/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Facebook will launch a slate of video shows on its video platform, Watch, on July 16.

Why it matters: The tech giant has been under immense pressure since the 2016 election to clean up the quality of news and information on its platform.

The details: The first slate of shows that will debut next week come from a mix of local, national and social publishers, including ATTN:, CNN, Fox News, Mic, Quartz, Bloomberg, and Univision. 

  • By the end of the summer, the company says that it will have roughly 20 different news partners as a part of its news push.
  • The shows will exist in a dedicated news section on Facebook's Watch tab. Like other sections on Watch, it will be personalized based on the publishers that a user follows and what their friends are watching.
  • Facebook hopes to mimic this experience for other non-news video partners, like gaming.

Axios first reported about the initiative in March, and the anticipation among publishers to see what it looks like has been building since.

Between the lines: Facebook has faced a rocky relationship with media publishers that have for years argued that the social giant has made billions of dollars in ad revenue off of their content without giving publishers their fair share of the cut or data insights about their audience.

  • Facebook has continued the work of its news partnerships team, which includes everything from pumping money into local news accelerator programs to giving media companies resources like traffic analysis tools.
  • Still, thousands of publishers around the world, mostly through their trade groups, have expressed discontent with how Facebook works with news publishers.
  • Facebook is hoping these partnerships, in which it is paying publishers to participate, will help ease at least some of their news partners’ concerns.

Facebook will be financing the news shows that air on its Watch platform. Sources say the company is in some cases paying up to $1 million for one year’s worth of production.

  • Eventually, Facebook says, it hopes to create an advertising platform so that these shows can be self-sustained on the platform.

Go deeper

Biden plans to keep Christopher Wray as FBI director

FBI Director Christopher Wray at a virtual DOJ news briefing on Oct. 28. Photo: Sarah Silbiger/pool/AFP via Getty Images

President Biden plans to keep Christopher Wray as director of the FBI, CNN first reported and an administration official confirmed to Axios.

The big picture: Wray, who was nominated by former President Trump in 2017 after he fired former FBI Director James Comey, came under heavy criticism from Trump and his allies over the past year.

2 hours ago - World

Netanyahu and Israel reluctantly adjust to a post-Trump Washington

Netanyahu (R) and Biden in 2010. Photo: Avi Ohayon/GPO via Getty

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his close aides are very nervous about the transition to a new U.S. administration after a four-year honeymoon with Donald Trump. One Israeli official told me it felt like going through detox.

What he's saying: Netanyahu congratulated Biden minutes after he was sworn in, saying in a statement that he looked forward to working together to "continue expanding peace between Israel and the Arab world and to confront common challenges, chief among them the threat posed by Iran."

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. State of play: New coronavirus cases down, but more bad news ahead.
  2. Politics: Biden set to immediately ramp up federal pandemic response with 10 executive actions — Scoop: Joe Biden's COVID-19 bubble.
  3. World: Biden will order U.S. to rejoin World Health OrganizationBiden to bring U.S. into global COVAX initiative for equitable vaccine access.
  4. Vaccine: Amazon offers to help Biden administration with COVID vaccine efforts.