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A new report shows that Facebook provided funds to many of the experts and organizations who were evaluating Messenger Kids, a messaging app for children that the company rolled out in December, per Wired.

Why it matters: The controversial app has received backlash from child development experts who say children under 13 can't "navigate the complexities of online relationships or protect their own privacy." Facebook claims it did its due diligence by consulting with thousands of parents and a 13-member expert advisory board while developing the app, but at least seven of those experts were found to have financial ties to the company.

The specs: In 2017, Facebook donated to...

  • Family Online Safety Institute, which has two members on the board
  • Connect Safely
  • Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence
  • MediaSmarts, which has two members on the board

Facebook's response: Per Wired, “There was no attempt to not be upfront about it,” said Antigone Davis, Facebook’s global head of safety. He added, “We’ve had that conversation publicly many, many times...we do not want there to be a financial burden to working with Facebook," and that the company sometimes provides "funding to cover programmatic or logistics expenses" of partner organizations.

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Updated 59 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Politics: Trump calls Fauci a "disaster" on campaign call.
  2. Health: Coronavirus hospitalizations are on the rise — 8 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week.
  3. States: California to independently review FDA-approved coronavirus vaccinesWisconsin judge reimposes capacity limit on indoor venues.
  4. Media: Trump attacks CNN as "dumb b---ards" for continuing to cover pandemic.
  5. World: Ireland moving back into lockdown as cases surge — Argentina becomes 5th country to report 5 million infections

USA Today breaks tradition by endorsing Joe Biden

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

USA Today, one of the largest newspapers by circulation in America, gave Joe Biden its first-ever presidential endorsement on Tuesday.

The big picture: A slew of media companies are endorsing a candidate this year for the first time ever, citing the unprecedented nature of this election.

1 hour ago - Technology

Exclusive: AP to call elections for Alexa and other Big Tech channels

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Many of the world's biggest tech and telecom companies, like Google, Amazon, Microsoft and AT&T, are licensing the Associated Press' election results to power their voice, video and search products, executives tell Axios.

How it works: Because tech firms need to answer millions of unique voice commands and search queries in real time, the results will be coded through an API — an interface that a computer program can read — designed to handle "not enough results in yet" and "too close to call" cases.