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Senator Al Franken of Minnesota. Photo: Carolyn Kaster / AP

Sen. Al Franken announced he will resign "in the coming weeks" following eight allegations of sexual misconduct and calls for resignation from over 30 colleagues.

Here are all the allegations against Franken:Nov. 17: Franken's first accuser, radio host Leeann Tweeden, said he groped and forcibly kissed her in 2006. Franken apologized to Tweeden, but said that that he remembers the encounter differently. That same day, Franken said he'd comply with a Senate Ethics Committee investigation into his past behavior.Nov. 20: Lindsay Menz alleged that Franken grabbed her butt while they took a photo together at the Minnesota State Fair in 2010. This was the first reported incident that allegedly occurred after Franken was elected to the U.S. Senate. He said he feels "badly that Ms. Menz came away from our interaction feeling disrespected."Nov. 22: Two women, both unnamed, came forward and said Franken "touched their butts" in unrelated incidents. Franken said he does not remember the events.Nov. 27: Rep. Kathleen Rice was the first Democrat to say Franken should resign. She also called for Democrat Rep. John Conyers' resignation.Nov. 30: Army veteran Stephanie Kemplin, now 41, said Franken cupped her breast during a photo op in Kuwait in 2003. A spokesperson for the senator said "he has never intentionally engaged in this kind of conduct." Nov. 30: A former elected official in New England claimed Franken tried to forcibly give her a "wet, open-mouthed kiss" on stage during an event in 2006. She was his 6th accuser. Nov. 30: The Ethics Committee confirms that it is investigation Franken.Dec. 6: Two more women, the 7th and 8th accusers, came forward against Franken. One of the women, a former Democratic congressional aide, alleged that the senator tried to forcibly kiss her in 2006 in the studio of his radio show. Franken said the allegation is "categorically not true." The second woman — former Democratic Hill staffer and columnist Tina Dupuy — said Franken groped her waist when they took a photo together in 2009.Dec. 6: A wave of 33 Democrats called on Franken to resign after the 7th allegation surfaced.Dec. 7: Franken announced his resignation, saying, "I, of all people, am aware of the irony that I am leaving while a man who bragged on tape about his history of sexual assault sits in the Oval Office, and a man who preyed on young girls runs for Senate with the full support of his party," referencing allegations against President Trump and Senate candidate Roy Moore.

Go deeper

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

In photos: The Biden and Harris inauguration

President Biden and first lady Jill Biden watch a fireworks show on the National Mall from the Truman Balcony at the White House on Wednesday night. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Biden signed his first executive orders into law from the Oval Office on Wednesday evening after walking in a brief inaugural parade to the White House with First Lady Jill Biden and members of their family. He was inaugurated with Vice President Kamala Harris at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday morning.

Why it matters: Many of Biden's day one actions immediately reverse key Trump administration policies, including rejoining the Paris Agreement and the World Health Organization, launching a racial equity initiative and reversing the Muslim travel ban.

Republicans pledge to set aside differences and work with Biden

President Biden speaks to Sen. Mitch McConnell after being sworn in at the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. Photo: Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty Images

Several Republicans praised President Biden's calls for unity during his inaugural address on Wednesday and pledged to work together for the benefit of the American people.

Why it matters: The Democrats only have a slim majority in the Senate and Biden will likely need to work with the GOP to pass his legislative agenda.

The Biden protection plan

Joe Biden announces his first run for the presidency in June 1987. Photo: Howard L. Sachs/CNP/Getty Images

The Joe Biden who became the 46th president on Wednesday isn't the same blabbermouth who failed in 1988 and 2008.

Why it matters: Biden now heeds guidance about staying on task with speeches and no longer worries a gaffe or two will cost him an election. His staff also limits the places where he speaks freely and off the cuff. This Biden protective bubble will only tighten in the months ahead, aides tell Axios.