Photo: Alex Brandon / AP

Minnesota Sen. Al Franken announced his decision to resign "in the coming weeks" during a speech on the Senate floor. More than 30 of his Democratic Senate colleagues called for him step down yesterday after a seventh allegation of sexual misconduct against Franken (which was followed shortly by an eighth). Franken referenced both President Trump and Roy Moore during his announcement, saying: "There is some irony that I am leaving while a man who has bragged on tape about his history of sexual assault sits in the Oval Office and a man who has repeatedly preyed on young girls campaigns for the Senate with the full support of his party."

What's next: Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton will choose Franken's immediate replacement. He said he'll make that decision "in the next couple of days," but his pick is rumored to be Lt. Gov. Tina Smith, according to the Minneapolis Star-Tribune. A special election for the remainder of his term will be held in November 2018, opening the seat for the midterm elections during what Democrats hope to be an electoral wave in their favor.

Video of the Trump-Moore moment:

More from Franken's speech:

  • "Some of the allegations against me are not true. Others I remember very differently."
  • "I am proud that during my time in the Senate I have used my power to be a champion of women…I know there's been a very different picture of me painted over the last few weeks, but I know who I really am."
  • "I know in my heart that nothing I have done as a senator — nothing — has brought dishonor on this institution, and I am confident that the Ethics Committee would agree."
  • "I have faith — or at least hope — that members of this Senate will find the political courage necessary to keep asking the tough questions, hold this administration accountable, and stand up for the truth."
  • "Even on the worst day of my political life, I feel that it has all been worth it...I would do it all over again in a heartbeat."

Go deeper

IG report: Saudi arms sales were legal but didn't weigh civilian casualties

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. Photo: Gabriel Kuchta/Getty Images

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo acted legally when he bypassed Congress to approve $8 billion in arms sales to Saudi Arabia, but failed to "fully assess risks and implement mitigation measures to reduce civilian casualties" that resulted from the deal, according to a report by the State Department inspector general.

Why it matters: The 2019 sale drew bipartisan ire among lawmakers, who worried it could lead to a pattern of the administration using "emergency declarations" to circumvent Congress to approve weapons deals. The report comes two months after former Inspector General Steve Linick testified that he was pressured by a top Pompeo aide to drop the investigation.

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Florida reports another daily record for coronavirus deaths

Nurse practitioner Barbara Corral and a research assistant conduct a COVID-19 vaccination study on August 7 in Hollywood, Florida. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Florida's health department on Tuesday reported 276 new coronavirus deaths, surpassing the state's record from July 31.

The big picture: The state also recorded over 5,800 new cases — on the low side for a state that is one of the domestic epicenters for the virus.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 p.m. ET: 20,130,206 — Total deaths: 737,394 — Total recoveries: 12,382,856Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 p.m. ET: 5,100,636 — Total deaths: 163,681 — Total recoveries: 1,670,755 — Total tests: 62,513,174Map.
  3. States: Florida reports another daily record for deaths State testing plans fall short of demand.
  4. Axios-Ipsos poll: 1 in 2 has a personal connection to COVID-19.
  5. Business: Moderna reveals it may not hold patent rights for vaccine.
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