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Paris under curfew. Photo: Kiran Ridley/Getty Images

The coronavirus is still winning: Now even Germany is entering another national lockdown, joined by France.

Why it matters: France has been "overpowered by a second wave,” President Emmanuel Macron said in a nationally televised address today. Macron said the "new wave will be stronger and deadlier" than the first.

The big picture: Hospitalizations are spiking in Europe, just like in the U.S.

  • German hospitalizations have doubled in the last 10 days, Chancellor Angela Merkel said today.
  • Dutch hospitals "have reached their limits" and they're sending patients to Germany, Reuters reports.
  • Russia says hospital beds are at 90% of capacity in 16 of its regions.

Between the lines: Europe's second lockdown will look a lot different.

  • Schools and child care will stay open.
  • It won't be as hard to visit assisted living facilities or go to funerals.
  • Germany's lockdown will end by Dec. 1.
  • France's runs through at least Dec. 1, but also requires daily infections to fall below 5,000.
  • There have been over 36,000 new cases in France in the last 24 hours.

The countries are also propping up affected sectors.

  • The German government will provide 75% compensation to small and midsize businesses hurt by the closures.

The bottom line: “Within weeks, we will reach the limits of our health system,” Merkel said today.

  • “It is completely clear that we must act, and act now, to prevent a national health crisis.”

Go deeper

Coronavirus cases rose 10% in the week before Thanksgiving

Expand chart
Data: The COVID Tracking Project, state health departments; Map: Andrew Witherspoon, Sara Wise/Axios

The daily rate of new coronavirus infections rose by about 10 percent in the final week before Thanksgiving, continuing a dismal trend that may get even worse in the weeks to come.

Why it matters: Travel and large holiday celebrations are most dangerous in places where the virus is spreading widely — and right now, that includes the entire U.S.

7 hours ago - Health

Africa CDC: Vaccines likely won't be available until Q2 of 2021

Africa CDC director Dr. John Nkengasong. Photo: Mohammed Abdu Abdulbaqi/Anadolu Agency via Getty

Africa may have to wait until the second quarter of 2021 to roll out vaccines, Africa CDC director John Nkengasong said Thursday, according to the Associated Press.

Why it matters: “I have seen how Africa is neglected when drugs are available,” Nkengasong said.

Updated 15 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Supreme Court backs religious groups on New York coronavirus restrictions

Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled late Wednesday that restrictions previously imposed on New York places of worship by Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) during the coronavirus pandemic violated the First Amendment.

Why it matters: The decision in a 5-4 vote heralds the first significant action by the new President Trump-appointed conservative Justice Amy Coney Barrett, who cast the deciding vote in favor of the Catholic Church and Orthodox Jewish synagogues.