Energy & Environment - Climate change

Climate change

The big picture

Gauging the public pulse on climate and energy policy

There is bipartisan support for renewables but steep divides over fossil fuels.

Nov 26, 2019 - Energy & Environment
What makes the 2020 election historic for climate change

It's both a defining and a polarizing election issue.

Nov 24, 2019 - Energy & Environment
Trump and Republicans are isolated on climate change

They're increasingly outliers in an otherwise emerging consensus that climate change is a problem.

Mar 18, 2019 - Energy & Environment
What your city's climate will be in 2080

Future climate conditions may have no parallel in modern human history, researchers say.

Updated Feb 15, 2019 - Energy & Environment
Where climate change will hit the U.S. hardest

Inequality among regions in the U.S. is likely to increase, with the South and lower Midwest hit the hardest.

Updated Jun 23, 2018 - Energy & Environment
How big corporations are — and aren't — fighting global warming

Corporations are stepping up, but it won't be enough.

Jun 23, 2018 - Energy & Environment

All Climate change stories

The fraught future of recycling

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

MANASSAS, Va. — The American recycling industry is in crisis — and cities are on the front lines.

The big picture: The economics undergirding the U.S. recycling system have fallen apart. Unable to absorb the extra cost, some cities are opting to kill recycling programs altogether — just as public concerns about climate change are ratcheting up.

The widening partisan divide on climate change

Reproduced from Pew Research Center U.S. Politics and Policy; Chart: Axios Visuals

The persistent partisan divide on climate change is getting wider, per a Pew Research Center survey.

The big picture: Since 2015, Democrats have become increasingly convinced (now at 78%) that climate change should be a top federal priority — while that same view among Republicans has remained relatively flat (now at 21%)

Go deeper: Climate change's surprise twist

Antarctica hits 69 degrees days after record-breaking heat

Aerial view of Glaciers from the Chilean Air Force Helicopter during flight to Brazilian Station Comandante Ferraz in December 2019. Photo: Alessandro Dahan/Getty Images

A weather station in Antarctica recorded a temperature of 69.3°F on February 9 — just days after the world's coldest continent hit a record-breaking 65°F, The Washington Post reports.

Why it matters: The United Nation's World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has yet to confirm this is the hottest recorded temperature. It's nonetheless an important finding that confirms a heatwave hit the most northern part of Antarctica, the Post writes.

Delta aims to become first "carbon neutral" airline

Photo: Nicolas Economou/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Delta Airlines is spending $1 billion over the next decade to essentially cancel out all of its future greenhouse gas emissions beginning March 1, the company announced Friday.

The big picture: Delta is the world’s biggest airline by revenue, and this news is the latest in a rapidly growing trend of corporations announcing climate-change goals in response to public and investor pressure.

BP's climate move could mean new pressure on Exxon and Chevron

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios 

BP's new emissions pledge could create more pressure on U.S.-based giants Exxon and Chevron.

Why it matters: European oil behemoths have been more active on climate than their U.S. counterparts.

Senators huddle over dinner with carbon-tax backers

Sen. Mike Braun. Photo: Sarah Silbiger/Stringer/Getty Images

Nearly two dozen proponents of a carbon tax across the corporate, economic and advocacy spectrum pitched their climate plan to a bipartisan group of senators over dinner this week.

Why it matters: It's a concrete sign of the growing pressure facing lawmakers to pass big policy on climate change, even though the chances of that happening any time soon remain slim.

BP vows to "fundamentally" change with net-zero emissions target

Photo: Lance King/Getty Images

BP said Wednesday that it is reorienting its business with new climate targets — including first-time emissions commitments for its products' use in the economy — and a new team to help countries, cities and other companies cut carbon.

Why it matters: It's the latest sign of how multinational oil-and-gas giants — especially European-headquartered players — are expanding climate pledges under intense pressure from activists and investors.

Republicans to detail climate policies on trees and carbon capture

Rep. Bruce Westerman, who is co-sponsoring the Trillion Trees Act. Photo: Bill Clark/Getty Images

House Republicans will detail one pillar of their three-pronged climate plan on Wednesday, focused on capturing carbon emissions.

Driving the news: The policies include subsidizing tree growth to build more wooden buildings, making permanent a subsidy for technology capturing CO2, and boosting federal support for that same tech.

California power crisis charges up battery sales

Close-up of screen terminal with wires on the negative terminal of a 12 volt solar photovoltaic battery bank. Photo: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

Sales of residential batteries in California are expected to quadruple this year to over 50,000 storage systems, the research firm BloombergNEF said in a short new analysis.

Why it matters: It adds specifics to the expectation that power outages — notably widespread blackouts by utilities seeking to cut wildfire risk — will juice sales.

Dominion joins power giants' net-zero carbon emissions push

Photo: Julian Stratenschulte/picture alliance via Getty Images

The huge utility Dominion Energy vowed Tuesday to achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.

Why it matters: Virginia-headquartered Dominion has ranked among the country's 10 largest power generators and operates in 18 states.

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