Climate change

The big picture

Gauging the public pulse on climate and energy policy

There is bipartisan support for renewables but steep divides over fossil fuels.

Nov 26, 2019 - Energy & Environment
What makes the 2020 election historic for climate change

It's both a defining and a polarizing election issue.

Nov 24, 2019 - Energy & Environment
Trump and Republicans are isolated on climate change

They're increasingly outliers in an otherwise emerging consensus that climate change is a problem.

Mar 18, 2019 - Energy & Environment
What your city's climate will be in 2080

Future climate conditions may have no parallel in modern human history, researchers say.

Updated Feb 15, 2019 - Energy & Environment
Where climate change will hit the U.S. hardest

Inequality among regions in the U.S. is likely to increase, with the South and lower Midwest hit the hardest.

Updated Jun 23, 2018 - Energy & Environment
How big corporations are — and aren't — fighting global warming

Corporations are stepping up, but it won't be enough.

Jun 23, 2018 - Energy & Environment

All Climate change stories

Hardly anyone talks about climate change

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Politicians, corporations, the media and activists are talking about climate change more than ever — but most Americans are not.

Be smart: If you’re reading this on social media, you’re probably the exception, not the rule. Just 9% of Americans talk about climate change often, surveys by Yale and George Mason University indicate.

Judge rules against Trump policy limiting public comment on energy leasing

Photo: Joe Amon/The Denver Post via Getty Images

A federal judge on Thursday overturned a 2018 Trump administration directive that sought to speed up energy leases on public land by limiting the amount of time the public could comment.

Why it matters: U.S. Chief Magistrate Judge Ronald Bush's decision voids almost a million acres of leases in the West, according to The Washington Post. It's a victory for environmentalists, who tried to block the change as part of an effort to protect the habitat of the at-risk greater sage grouse.

  • The ruling invalidated five oil and gas leases in Nevada, Utah, and Wyoming, and affected 104,688 square miles of greater sage-grouse habitat, per The Associated Press.
  • Leases in greater sage-grouse habitat will return to allowing 30 days of public comment and administrative protest.

The big picture: From Axios' Amy Harder, this is the latest in a long and convoluted list of regulatory rollbacks the Trump administration is pursuing on environmental rules that courts are, more often than not, rebutting. With Congress gridlocked on these matters, expect the courts to be the default way Trump's agenda faces checks (unless, of course, a Democrat wins the White House this November).

Senate pushes bipartisan energy innovation bill

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

A sweeping energy bill boosting federal support for everything from renewable energy to cybersecurity may get a vote as soon as next week.

Driving the news: The bipartisan leaders of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) and Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.), introduced the American Energy Innovation Act yesterday.

Uber and Lyft's rise may be fueling climate change

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

A new analysis provides the latest evidence that the explosive growth of ride-hailing services like Uber and Lyft is making it harder to fight CO2 emissions from transportation.

Driving the news: The Union of Concerned Scientists studied the triple-whammy of trips replacing climate-friendly transit, inducing new travel and "deadhead" miles — that is, when ride-hailing vehicles move without passengers.

Ex-diplomats sketch out two visions of climate change in 2050

Christiana Figueres at the 2019 Web Summit. Photo: NurPhoto / Contributor

Two architects of the Paris Climate Agreement present a pair of possible scenarios for the global climate in 2050 — one in which we've met the carbon reduction targets laid out in the agreement, and one in which we've failed.

Why it matters: The authors argue that we have a decade left to pick which path the planet will take: catastrophe or hope.

There's hope that Congress may pass energy legislation in 2020

Photo: DEA/M. BORCHI/Getty Images

Some climate and energy legislation could actually reach the finish line this year in a divided Congress, according to a new analysis from the think tank Third Way.

Driving the news: Third Way says that's not crazy, pointing to a series of modest measures where "priorities are aligned" on both sides of Capitol Hill.

Cracks emerge in the oil lobby over climate change

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

European-based oil giants' evolving steps on climate change are cracking — but not yet rupturing — the industry's lobbying and advocacy relationships in the U.S.

Driving the news: This morning BP said it's leaving three groups over differences on climate policy: American Fuel & Petrochemical Manufacturers, the Western States Petroleum Association, and the Western Energy Alliance.

Report: BP abandoning trade groups in climate split

BP CEO Bernard Looney speaks during an event in London on Feb. 12. Photo: Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP via Getty Images

Oil-and-gas giant BP is planning to leave at least two industry trade groups due to differences over climate change policy, The Washington Post reported Tuesday night.

Driving the news: BP is expected to leave American Fuel & Petrochemical Manufacturers (AFPM), and the Western States Petroleum Association (WSPA), they report. The WSPA confirmed to Axios that BP is leaving.

Why big banks are breaking up with some fossil fuels

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

JPMorgan Chase is the latest financial giant to unveil new climate commitments, and like its peers, it is hard to disentangle how much is motivated by pressure, conscience or making a virtue of necessity.

Why it matters: The move comes as grassroots and shareholder activists are targeting the financial sector's fossil energy finance, especially amid federal inaction on climate.

One-third of U.S. voters believe climate change is a crisis

Climate change activists in Los Angeles on Feb. 7. Photo: Ronen Tivony/Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Over one-third of registered voters consider climate change a crisis and 59% say the Trump administration is doing too little to address it, a Brunswick Group survey released Tuesday shows.

Why it matters: The datareleased Tuesday arrives as climate is playing a more prominent role in the 2020 election cycle — and the policy stakes are high.

More Climate change stories