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Tweets from President Trump masked with warnings imposed by Twitter stating that they may be incorrect. Photo: Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

This week's election count is already giving the large tech platforms a taste of their future content-moderation challenges.

The state of play: Each day is proving harder than the last for internet gatekeepers amid swirling conspiracy theories, misinformation from elected leaders and growing violent speech from pockets of the far right.

In addition to the new measures put in place by Facebook:

  • After former Trump adviser Steve Bannon said that Anthony Fauci and FBI director Christopher Wray should be beheaded, Twitter banned the account tied to Bannon's radio show. Google’s YouTube took down a video of the comments and blocked the account from uploading videos for a week.
  • Twitter continued to aggressively label tweets from the Trump campaign and allies and put a warning on a post from Donald Trump Jr.slowing its spread. However, the campaign took to tweeting statements via screenshots, which seemed to successfully dodge action from Twitter (though those posts aren't spreading as fast).

Between the lines: The pressure isn't limited to social media, as traditional media outlets also struggle to deal with the president's evidence-free charges undermining trust in the election.

  • MSNBC, for example, cut away almost immediately from Trump's White House appearance Thursday, with NPR also quickly pivoting to a fact check.
  • Other networks, including CNN, carried the full address, but then immediately pointed out the falsehoods it contained.

Meanwhile, fresh questions arose about whether video of Trump's speech itself should be removed from social media. USA Today pulled the video off its site, with its editor saying "our job is to spread truth — not unfounded conspiracies."

Go deeper

Dec 1, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Exclusive: Don Jr. tells Georgia Senate voters that Trump is on the ballot

Photo: Eva Marie Uzcategui T./Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

In a six-figure radio ad being released in Georgia today, Donald Trump Jr. tells the state's voters that the U.S. Senate — and his father's accomplishments — are on the line during January's special election, according to audio obtained by Axios.

Why it matters: Trump Jr.'s first of many advertisements in the Georgia Senate races argues the race isn't just about electing the Republican incumbents, but also about preserving President Trump's agenda.

Biden plans to ask public to wear masks for first 100 days in office

Joe Biden. Photo: Mark Makela/Gettu Images

President-elect Joe Biden told CNN on Thursday that he plans to ask the American public to wear face masks for the first 100 days of his presidency.

The big picture: Biden also stated he has asked NIAID director Anthony Fauci to stay on in his current role, serve as a chief medical adviser and be part of his COVID-19 response team when he takes office early next year.

What COVID-19 vaccine trials still need to do

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

COVID-19 vaccines are being developed at record speed, but some experts fear the accelerated regulatory process could interfere with ongoing research about the vaccines.

Why it matters: Even after the first COVID-19 vaccines are deployed, scientific questions will remain about how they are working and how to improve them.