Jul 31, 2019

What Democrats are doing on health care

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

As Democratic presidential candidates debate their ideal health care system, blue states are making incremental — yet significant — changes to the existing one.

Why it matters: In the states where they have power, Democrats are creating a blueprint for how the ACA could evolve under Democratic control in Washington.

Where it stands: California recently passed the most ambitious expansions of the ACA to date.

  • It made the ACA's premium subsidies available to middle-class people, and made undocumented children and young adult immigrants eligible for the state Medicaid program.
  • "This isn’t just the ACA warmed over. This is actually taking steps beyond it to make it better," said Peter Lee, executive director of Covered California, the state ACA exchange.

Other states have also made significant changes.

What's next: If a future Democratic president wanted something less ambitious than "Medicare for All," these reforms will provide a starting point.

The other side: Republican-led states are surging ahead on their own reforms, like adding work requirements to Medicaid.

The bottom line: "Red states and blue states are moving in very different directions on health care, taking advantage of new flexibility on the one hand and combating efforts by the Trump administration on the other," said Larry Levitt of the Kaiser Family Foundation.

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The latest: George Floyd protests nationwide

Police officers wearing riot gear push back demonstrators outside of the White House on Monday. Photo: Jose Luis Magana/AFP via Getty Images

Protests over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black people continued for a seventh day across the U.S., with President Trump threatening on Monday to deploy the military if the unrest continues.

The latest: New York Attorney General Letitia James responded to Trump's comments by tweeting that he "is not a dictator & he doesn’t have the right to unilaterally deploy U.S. military across American states. We will guard the right to peaceful protest & will not hesitate to go to court to protect our constitutional rights during this time & well into the future."

2 hours ago - World

The world watches America burn

Newspaper front pages via the Newseum

The world is watching the grief and anger, violence and pain in America's streets.

The big picture: The U.S. accounts for nearly one-third of the world's deaths from COVID-19. The killing of a black man, George Floyd, by police has sparked days of protest and nights of chaos in America's major cities.

Trump walks to historic St. John's Church outside White House as protests rage

President Trump walked to the historic St. John’s Episcopal Church, located just steps away from the White House across Lafayette Park, on Monday night as protests linked to the murder of George Floyd raged across the capital and cities around the country.

What we're seeing: Military police and park rangers used physical force and tear gas on peaceful protestors to clear the area so that Trump could "pay respects" to the church that was damaged by a fire on Sunday.