California Gov. Gavin Newsom. Photo: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

California will become the first state in the nation to pay for the health benefits of some unauthorized immigrants and become the first state to extend the Affordable Care Act's premium subsidies up the income scale.

Why it matters: One of the bluest states in the nation's measured steps toward universal health coverage show the uphill battle liberals face in their push for Medicare for All.

Details: Low-income adults between ages 19 and 25 living in the state illegally will qualify, based on their income, for the state Medicaid program.

  • Officials estimate that this will be about 90,000 people costing $98 million a year.
  • The deal includes a proposal to provide ACA subsidies to middle-income people making up to six times the federal poverty level.
  • To help pay for the deal, the state will tax the uninsured — a revival of the ACA's individual mandate.

The big picture: These more incremental steps demonstrate how far left Democrats have moved in the decade since the ACA's passage.

  • "California has taken the lead to blunt Republican efforts nationally on a whole range of health care issues, moving very much in the opposite direction," emailed the Kaiser Family Foundation's Larry Levitt.

Go deeper: In California's blue utopia, liberal health care dreams stagnate

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Lawmakers demand answers from World Bank on Xinjiang loan

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

U.S. lawmakers are demanding answers from the World Bank about its continued operation of a $50 million loan program in Xinjiang, following Axios reporting on the loans.

Why it matters: The Chinese government is currently waging a campaign of cultural and demographic genocide against ethnic minorities in Xinjiang, in northwest China. The lawmakers contend that the recipients of the loans may be complicit in that repression.

Obama: Americans could be "collateral damage" in Trump's war on mail-in voting

Photo: Zahim Mohd/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Former President Barack Obama tweeted Friday that everyday Americans could become "collateral damage" if President Trump continues to attempt to slash funding for the U.S. Postal Service as part of his campaign against mail-in voting.

Why it matters: Trump linked his baseless claims that increased mail-in voting will lead to widespread voter fraud on Thursday to the current impasse in coronavirus stimulus negotiations.

Elon Musk is channeling Henry Ford in auto manufacturing

Photo illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios. Photo: Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images

Tesla CEO Elon Musk, who has spent more than a decade trying to disrupt the traditional auto industry, is sounding more and more like the man most closely associated with it: Henry Ford.

Why it matters: In his quest to build affordable electric cars for the masses, Musk is starting to embrace many of the ideas pioneered by Ford's founder — things like vertical supply chains and an obsession with manufacturing efficiency. A century ago that approach helped to popularize the American automobile by lowering the cost of the Model T.