Nov 21, 2019

Debate night: Buttigieg says he welcomes the challenge of attracting black voters

South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg acknowledged his struggle with black voters at the 5th Democratic debate Wednesday, saying that he welcomes "the challenge" and relates to the fight for civil rights through his experience as a gay man.

BUTTIGIEG: "I welcome the challenge of connecting with black voters in America who don't yet know me ... and I care about this because, while I do not have the experience of ever having been discriminated against because of the color of my skin, I do have the experience of sometimes feeling like a stranger in my own country. Turning on the news and seeing my own rights come up for debate, and seeing my rights expanded by a coalition of people like me and people not at all like me, working side by side, shoulder to shoulder, making it possible for me to be standing here wearing this wedding ring in a way that couldn't have happened two elections ago, lets me know just how deep my obligation is to help those whose rights are on the line every day even if they are nothing like me in their experience."

Why it matters: Buttigieg has largely failed to gain the support of black voters. He was criticized for demoting South Bend's black police chief prior entering the presidential race. His leadership was also questioned following an officer-involved shooting of a black man in his city in July. The mayor took a leave of absence from the campaign to respond to the community's concerns.

  • Buttigieg was also criticized this week over his campaign for using a stock photo of a Kenyan woman to illustrate his plan to advance America's black communities.
  • A campaign spokesperson apologized for the use of the photo, per USA Today, but added that the use of stock photos is "standard practice across many campaigns."

Go deeper:

Editor's note: This story has been updated to clarify that Mayor Pete Buttigieg did not fire South Bend's police chief. Buttigieg demoted the city's police chief prior to entering the presidential race.

Go deeper

Zuckerberg says Trump’s “shooting” tweet didn’t violate Facebook’s rules

Mark Zuckerberg at the 56th Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany on February 15. Photo: Abdulhamid Hosbas/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Facebook did not remove President Trump's threat to send the National Guard to Minneapolis because the company's policy on inciting violence allows discussion on state use of force, CEO Mark Zuckerberg explained in a post on Friday.

The big picture: Zuckerberg's statement comes on the heels of leaked internal criticism from Facebook employees over how the company handled Trump's posts about the Minneapolis protests and his unsubstantiated claims on mail-in ballots — both of which Twitter has now taken action on.

Updated 32 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7:30 p.m. ET: 5,916,464— Total deaths: 364,357 — Total recoveries — 2,468,634Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7:30 p.m. ET: 1,744,258 — Total deaths: 102,709 — Total recoveries: 406,446 — Total tested: 16,099,515Map.
  3. Public health: Hydroxychloroquine prescription fills exploded in March —How the U.S. might distribute a vaccine.
  4. 2020: North Carolina asks RNC if convention will honor Trump's wish for no masks or social distancing.
  5. Business: Fed chair Powell says coronavirus is "great increaser" of income inequality.
  6. 1 sports thing: NCAA outlines plan to get athletes back to campus.

Trump says he spoke with George Floyd's family

President Trump in the Rose Garden on May 29. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

President Trump told reporters on Friday that he had spoken with the family of George Floyd, a black resident of Minneapolis who died after a police officer knelt on his neck on Monday.

Driving the news: Former Vice President Joe Biden said via livestream a few hours earlier that he, too, had spoken with Floyd's family. The presumptive Democratic presidential nominee implored white Americans to consider systemic injustices against African Americans more broadly, Axios' Alexi McCammond reports.