Neighbors worked together to clear as much snow as possible from E. 8th St. in Duluth, Minnesota Sunday. Photo: Alex Kormann/Star Tribune via Getty Images

A trans-continental winter storm moving into the Northeast Sunday is tormenting travelers and being blamed for multiple deaths, AP reports.

What's happening: The National Weather Service issued winter storm warnings for upstate New York and New England, where nearly a foot of snow was expected to fall. Ice accumulations were forecast for parts of Pennsylvania and California was also under a storm warning, with the Bay Area bracing for "a foot of total rainfall between Saturday and Wednesday morning," per the Los Angeles Times.

  • Another storm that developed in the mid-Atlantic Sunday is set to move into a nor’easter through Monday, per the NWS.
  • Nearly 2,200 flights were delayed and nearly over 300 canceled by Sunday night, per FlightAware.
  • The wild weather caused nearly 9,000 utility customers to lose power in the "mountain communities northeast of Los Angeles," AP reports.

The big picture: The storm system has been moving across the U.S. this week, spanning from California across the northern Midwest.

  • The storm has caused deaths in Arizona and Missouri. Multiple major highways were closed over the weekend to prevent road incidents.

Go deeper:

America's upgraded weather forecast model still lags behind Europe

In photos: Impact of powerful Thanksgiving storms across the U.S.

Editor's note: This article has been updated with more details on weather and transport developments.

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Louisville officer: "Breonna Taylor would be alive" if we had served no-knock warrant

Breonna Taylor memorial in Louisville. Photo: Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly, the Louisville officer who led the botched police raid that caused the death of Breonna Taylor, said the No. 1 thing he wishes he had done differently is either served a "no-knock" warrant or given five to 10 seconds before entering the apartment: "Breonna Taylor would be alive, 100 percent."

Driving the news: Mattingly, who spoke to ABC News and Louisville's Courier Journal for his public interview, was shot in the leg in the initial moments of the March 13 raid. Mattingly did not face any charges after Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron said he and another officer were "justified" in returning fire to protect themselves against Taylor's boyfriend.

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