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New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo during a July briefing in New York City. Photo: Jeenah Moon/Getty Images)

Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) pushed back against President Trump late Wednesday after he singled out New York in a memo threatening to cut funding to "anarchist jurisdictions."

What he's saying: "It's cheap, it's political, it's gratuitous, and it's illegal," Cuomo told reporters, per multiple reports. He added Trump is now "persona non grata" in New York City. "Forget bodyguards, he better have an army if he thinks he’s gonna walk down the street in New York. New Yorkers don’t want to have anything to do with him," Cuomo said of his fellow Queens native. "The best thing he did for New York City was leave."

  • The Trump administration did not immediately return Axios' request for comment.

Go deeper

Nov 29, 2020 - Health

New York City to reopen public schools with weekly testing

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio in New York on Nov. 28. Photo: Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images

Some New York City schools will be allowed to reopen for in-person learning as early as Dec. 7, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Sunday.

The state of play: De Blasio said schools will no longer be forced to shutter when the city hits a 3% COVID-19 test positivity rate, but he did not specify what the new threshold will be. The school district will mandate weekly tests for 20% of children in each school, and students will not be tested before they return.

43 mins ago - World

Putin foe Navalny to be detained for 30 days after returning to Moscow

Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny. Photo: Oleg Nikishin/Epsilon/Getty Images

Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny has been ordered to remain in pre-trial detention for 30 days, following his arrest upon returning to Russia on Sunday for the first time since a failed assassination attempt last year.

Why it matters: The detention of Navalny, an anti-corruption activist and the most prominent domestic critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin, has already set off a chorus of condemnations from leaders in Europe and the U.S.

Biden picks Warren allies to lead SEC, CFPB

Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden has selected FTC commissioner Rohit Chopra to be the next director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and Obama-era Wall Street regulator Gary Gensler to lead the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

Why it matters: Both picks are progressive allies of Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and viewed as likely to take aggressive steps to regulate big business.