Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on the day's biggest business stories

Subscribe to Axios Closer for insights into the day’s business news and trends and why they matter

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sign up for Axios Pro Rata

Dive into the world of dealmakers across VC, PE and M&A with Axios Pro Rata. Delivered daily to your inbox by Dan Primack and Kia Kokalitcheva.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sports news worthy of your time

Binge on the stats and stories that drive the sports world with Axios Sports. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tech news worthy of your time

Get our smart take on technology from the Valley and D.C. with Axios Login. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Get the inside stories

Get an insider's guide to the new White House with Axios Sneak Peek. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Denver news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Des Moines news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Twin Cities news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Tampa Bay news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Charlotte news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Nashville news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with the Axios Nashville newsletter.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Columbus news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with the Axios Columbus newsletter.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Dallas news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with the Axios Dallas newsletter.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Austin news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with the Axios Austin newsletter.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Atlanta news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with the Axios Atlanta newsletter.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Philadelphia news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with the Axios Philadelphia newsletter.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Chicago news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with the Axios Chicago newsletter.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sign up for Axios NW Arkansas

Stay up-to-date on the most important and interesting stories affecting NW Arkansas, authored by local reporters

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top DC news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with the Axios DC newsletter.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The U.S. now has three COVID-19 vaccines, and public health officials are quick — and careful — to say there’s no bad option. But their effectiveness, manufacturing and distribution vary.

Why it matters: Any of the authorized vaccines are much better than no vaccine, especially for people at high risk of severe coronavirus infections. But their differences may fuel perceptions of inequity, and raise legitimate questions about the best way to use each one.

The big picture: Under the threat of new variants, vaccinating as many people as fast as possible is key to controlling the outbreak in the U.S. Public health experts are generally united in saying that Americans should get whichever vaccine they are offered first.

  • All three vaccines authorized for use in the U.S. — from Moderna, Pfizer and BioNTech, and Johnson & Johnson — registered a very high efficacy in preventing hospitalization and death from COVID-19.
  • “The efficacy against severe disease [is] greater than 85%, and there have been no hospitalization or deaths in multiple countries, even in countries that have the variants,” NIAID Director Anthony Fauci said of the Johnson & Johnson shot this weekend on ABC’s “This Week.” “Be careful when you try to parse this percent versus that.”

It is difficult to compare the vaccines head-to-head based on existing clinical trial data, but there are key differences.

  • The most obvious is the dosing. J&J requires only one shot, although a second booster dose is being tested. Pfizer and Moderna’s vaccines require two doses, a few weeks apart.
  • Pfizer and Moderna’s vaccines have, so far, been more effective than the J&J vaccine in clinical trials at preventing any symptomatic disease. Some experts quickly point out that the vaccines weren’t compared directly against one another, so the differences may be on paper only.
  • But on paper, those differences appear significant: The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines offer protection of more than 90%, while J&J’s efficacy against symptomatic disease is 66%.

On the other hand, some people may prefer J&J’s one-and-done approach.

  • It appears to offer protection against a variant first detected in South Africa. The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines appear to be less effective against this variant, though it is unclear how much less effective and the companies are studying it.
  • J&J is also cheaper and easier to ship than the other two shots.

Yes, but: Whether the vaccines are equally as good or not, the efficacy numbers are already fueling the perception of a two-tiered vaccine system, the Washington Post reports.

  • “J&J is going to be a challenge for all of us,” Washington Gov. Jay Inslee told WaPo in an interview.
  • And if the J&J vaccine is heavily used in communities of color, which have already borne the brunt of the pandemic, trust could be further eroded.
  • “If we end up with a hierarchy that says all rich White people get Pfizer, and all poor Black people get J&J, that would be a problem,” Helene Gayle, president and chief executive of the Chicago Community Trust, told the Post.

What they’re saying: “The whole thing is awkward. Everyone is treading on eggshells, because we want to get the right message across,” said John Moore, a Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at Cornell University. “The nuances are very hard because we don’t have concrete answers to every question.”

  • In an ideal world, it may make sense to give the J&J vaccine to younger people, he said, because that would potentially lower the risk of resistant variants emerging.
  • “The problem is, we don’t really have the luxury of time or of doing all the clinical trials you’d like to see done.”

What we’re watching: "Trying to convince people that the vaccines are all equal isn’t going to work. People are making claims that go beyond the solid data we have, and that’s a risky proposition. We’re going to see the differences in rates of adverse events, for example, pretty quickly for ourselves once we know lots of people getting vaccinated," clinical-trial expert Hilda Bastian told Vox.

  • "Especially when the fear of major outbreaks subsides — prematurely — and we’re trying to get younger people to accept vaccination, adverse reactions are going to matter to people."

The bottom line: “The worst option is no vaccine. And in the end, any of these approved vaccines is better than no vaccine, and that’s absolutely solid,” Moore said.

Go deeper: Get smarter, faster with our short course on vaccines.

Editor's note: This story was clarified to indicate the 501Y.V2 variant was first detected in South Africa (not necessarily originated there). 

Go deeper

Mar 2, 2021 - World

China and Russia vaccinate the world — for now

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

While the U.S. and Europe focus on vaccinating their own populations, China and Russia are sending millions of COVID-19 vaccine doses to countries around the world.

Why it matters: China's double success in controlling its domestic outbreak and producing several viable vaccines has allowed it to focus on providing doses abroad — an effort that could help to save lives across several continents.

Fauci donates personal COVID-19 model to Smithsonian

Anthony Fauci, chief medical adviser to the White House, with the model, which shows the "components of the SARS-CoV-2 virion (the complete, infectious form of the virus), including the spike protein," per a statement. Photo: Smithsonian/National Museum of American History

NIAID director Anthony Fauci gave the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History his personal COVID-19 model Tuesday, as he was honored with the institution's Great Americans Medal.

The big picture: Fauci virtually presented the educational tool, made with a 3D printer, to museum director Anthea Hartig. She praised him in a statement for his "humanitarianism" and "dedication," helping to "save millions of lives" and advance the treatment and understanding of infectious and immunologic diseases. Fauci said in a video the medal was a "humbling honor."

Scoop: U.S. begins denying Afghan immigrants

Afghan refugees on a bus bound for temporary housing after arriving in Greece. Photo: Byron Smith/Getty Images

The Biden administration has begun issuing denials to Afghans seeking to emigrate to the United States through the humanitarian parole process, after a system that typically processes 2,000 applications annually has been flooded with more than 30,000.

Why it matters: Afghans face steeper odds and longer processes for escaping to the U.S., despite the earlier sweeping efforts by the Biden administration to assist its allies. Immigration lawyers and advocacy groups say the government has set untenable barriers to a safe haven in the U.S.