May 12, 2020 - Health

Russia reports most coronavirus cases outside the U.S.

A medical worker and patient after conducting a computed tomography scan in Khimki, Russia, on May 12. Photo: Sergei Bobylev\TASS via Getty Images

Russia is reporting the most novel coronavirus cases in the world outside of the U.S., per Johns Hopkins data.

The big picture: Russia first reported a surge of more than 35,000 cases between April 30 and May 3. The country has reported more than 2,100 deaths as of Tuesday afternoon, a significantly lower number than the other most-affected countries such as Spain, Italy and the United Kingdom.

  • Russian President Vladimir Putin's spokesperson and close adviser Dmitry Peskov was recently hospitalized after testing positive for the coronavirus, following positive tests for several other senior officials, including Prime Minister Mikhail Mishustin.

Between the lines: China has reported fewer infections and deaths than other countries battling COVID-19, but its reporting has encountered considerable skepticism from the CIA and leaders around the world.

Go deeper: Russia goes after coronavirus in latest health misinformation push

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U.S. coronavirus updates

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios. This graphic includes "probable deaths" that New York City began reporting on April 14.

More than 100,000 Americans have died of the coronavirus, according to data from Johns Hopkins — a milestone that puts the death toll far beyond some of the most tragic events in U.S. history.

By the numbers: Over 1.6 million have tested positive in the U.S. Nearly 354,000 Americans have recovered and over 15.1 million tests have been conducted. California became the fourth state with at least 100,000 reported cases of the coronavirus on Wednesday, along with Illinois, New Jersey and New York.

Go deeper (2 min. read)ArrowUpdated 14 hours ago - Health

U.S. coronavirus death toll crosses 100,000

Data: Johns Hopkins University; Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

More than 100,000 Americans have died of the coronavirus, according to data from Johns Hopkins — a terrible milestone that puts the death toll far beyond some of the most tragic events in U.S. history.

By the numbers: The death toll from COVID-19 now stands at more than 34 times the number of people who died on 9/11.

Coronavirus still has a foothold in the South

Data: The COVID Tracking Project, state health departments; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Overall, new coronavirus infections in the U.S. are on the decline. But a small handful of states, mainly clustered in the South, aren't seeing any improvement.

The big picture: Our progress, nationwide, is of course good news. But it's fragile progress, and it’s not universal. Stubborn pockets of infection put lives at risk, and they can spread, especially as state lockdowns continue to ease.