Protestors rally in Minneapolis. Photo: Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Health experts fear that massive protests against police brutality in major cities around the United States could result in new coronavirus outbreaks due to the close proximity of demonstrators, AP reports.

Why it matters: The U.S. has already recorded more confirmed coronavirus cases and deaths than any other country in the world. A potential surge in cases stemming from the protests would come as many states are weeks into their phased reopening plans.

What they're saying: The mayor of Atlanta, one of dozens of cities shaken by recent protests, told demonstrators: “If you were out protesting last night, you probably need to go get a COVID test this week. There is still a pandemic in America that’s killing black and brown people at higher numbers."

  • On Thursday, the Minneapolis health commissioner warned protestors to "be mindful of the risk" and said the large demonstrations the city has seen could “very predictably accelerate the spread.”
  • “We have two crises that are sandwiched on top of one other,” Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey added.
  • “Whether they’re fired up or not, that doesn’t prevent them from getting the virus,” said Bradley Pollock, chairman of the Department of Public Health Sciences at the University of California, Davis, told AP.

Between the lines: Though many protesters were wearing masks during demonstrations, it does not guarantee total protection against the virus.

  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said that cloth masks help keep infected people from spreading the virus, but that they cannot fully protect wearers from contracting it, according to AP.

Go deeper: U.S. cities crack down on protesters

Go deeper

Updated Jul 10, 2020 - Health

U.S. coronavirus updates

Data: The COVID Tracking Project; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

South Carolina restaurants and bars will have to close alcohol sales by 11 p.m., beginning Saturday, under an order issued Friday by Gov. Henry McMaster.

The big picture: The U.S. had another record single-day spike of 63,200 new coronavirus cases from Thursday. COVID-19 cases in South Carolina have increased, with 21,560 cases recorded in the last two weeks.

Updated 12 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 5:30 p.m. ET: 12,607,510 — Total deaths: 562,338 — Total recoveries — 6,948,863Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 5:30 p.m. ET: 3,228,884 — Total deaths: 134,600 — Total recoveries: 983,185 — Total tested: 38,919,421Map.
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  6. World: India reimposes lockdowns as coronavirus cases soar.
Jun 30, 2020 - Health

CDC expert warns U.S. has "way too much virus" to contain outbreak

CDC principal deputy director Anne Schuchat speaks during a February White House briefing as CDC director Robert Redfield, Vice President Mike Pence and President Trump look on. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The novel coronavirus is spreading too widely and quickly to contain, CDC principal deputy director Anne Schuchat told The Journal of the American Medical Association Monday, warning she expects "this virus to continue to circulate."

Why it matters: Per Schuchat, "This is really the beginning, and what we hope is that we can take it seriously and slow the transmission." Her comments are in contrast to those of senior members of the Trump administration — notably Vice President Mike Pence, who said on Friday "we have made truly remarkable progress."