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Monkeys in New Delhi, India, April 10. Photo: Money Sharma/AFP via Getty Images

With half the world's population on lockdown, wild animals are roaming freely in cities and regions usually bustling with people.

The big picture: From South Africa to the South Australian city of Adelaide, take a look at some of the species thriving in areas under restrictions from the novel coronavirus.

Wild boars take advantage of a lack of people during the lockdown in Ajaccio, capital of Corsica, April 18. Photo: Pascal Pochard-Casabianca/AFP via Getty Images
A seabird on clearer waters in a Venice canal, March 17. Italy has reported more "fish, ducks and dolphins in the empty canals," the World Economic Forum notes. This is due to a "reduction in boat traffic," per Snopes which found the return of such wildlife to Italy's waterways "were not necessarily new phenomena" related to the lockdown. Photo: Andrea Pattaro/AFP via Getty Images
Mountain goats roam the streets of LLandudno in Wales, March 31. Photo: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images
Conservationists in Florida told CBS 12 that Leatherback sea turtles have been thriving during the lockdown measures. The state announced Friday that some parks and beaches were reopening for some activities. Photo: Mark Conlin/VW PICS/UIG via Getty Images
Buffalo walk on an empty New Delhi highway, April 8. Photo: Yawar Nazir/Getty Images

Go deeper: Coronavirus could impinge on summer plans and seasonal business

Editor's note: This article has been updated with video of the kangaroo and more information on the wildlife in Venice.

Go deeper

Updated Jul 27, 2020 - Politics & Policy

In photos: Civil rights icon John Lewis honored with ceremonies across Alabama

A horse-drawn carriage carrying the body of the late Rep. John Lewis on July 26 crosses the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, where Lewis and other civil rights leaders were attacked by police officers while marching in support of voting rights. Photo: Lynsey Weatherspoon/Getty Images

The life of the late Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) is being celebrated in a series of memorials this weekend across Alabama, the state in which he was born.

The big picture: Six days of remembrance for the giant of the civil rights movement, who died on July 17 at age 80, began Saturday morning with a service celebrating "The Boy from Troy" at Trojan Arena, Troy University, per a schedule provided by his family.

17 mins ago - Health

Moderna to file for FDA emergency use authorization for COVID-19 vaccine

Photo illustration by STR/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Moderna announced that it plans to file with the FDA Monday for an emergency use authorization for its coronavirus vaccine, which the company said has an efficacy rate of 94.1%.

Why it matters: Moderna will become the second company to file for a vaccine EUA after Pfizer did the same earlier this month, potentially paving the way for the U.S. to have two COVID-19 vaccines in distribution by the end of the year. The company said its vaccine has a 100% efficacy rate against severe COVID cases.

The social media addiction bubble

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Right now, everyone from Senate leaders to the makers of Netflix's popular "Social Dilemma" is promoting the idea that Facebook is addictive.

Yes, but: Human beings have raised fears about the addictive nature of every new media technology since the 18th century brought us the novel, yet the species has always seemed to recover its balance once the initial infatuation wears off.