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Cornyn speaks during the Senate Select Intelligence Committee hearing. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) told CNN on Monday that "of course" Senate Republicans would confirm President Trump's Supreme Court nominee in a lame-duck session even if Joe Biden wins the November election.

Why it matters: Democrats need only two more Republican senators to oppose voting on a Supreme Court nominee before the election to force Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) to hold a vote in the lame-duck session of Congress.

  • If Trump loses the election and Democrats take control of the Senate, there will be be enormous pressure on Republicans to defer to the incoming winners.

What they're saying: Asked whether the Senate would confirm a Trump nominee in a lame-duck session if Biden wins the presidency, Cornyn responded: "You mean while we're still in our term office, and President Trump is? Of course."

Go deeper: Where key GOP senators stand on replacing Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Go deeper

Updated Dec 29, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Georgia's GOP senators back $2,000 stimulus checks ahead of runoff

Sens. Kelly Loeffler (R-Ga.) and David Perdue (R-Ga.) on Tuesday both came out in favor of increasing direct payments in the coronavirus relief package from $600 to $2,000 per person.

Why it matters: The two Republican senators are on the ballot in a pair of runoffs in Georgia next week that will determine control of the Senate.

Senate tide begins to shift toward $2,000 checks after Trump's push

Sen. Marco Rubio campaigning for Sens. Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue in Georgia. Photo: Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

A couple of days ago, it looked impossible that $2,000 COVID relief checks — up from the $600 checks for individuals in the package President Trump signed Sunday — could pass the Senate. That has changed with Trump's final-hours advocacy for bigger checks, Republican sources tell Axios.

The state of play: It's still an uphill battle. But Republican senators are feeling more pressure from constituents — pumped by Trump — to do more.

Updated Dec 28, 2020 - Politics & Policy

House votes to increase stimulus payments to $2,000 per person

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

The House voted 275-134 on Monday to increase direct payments from its coronavirus relief package to $2,000 per person, up from the $600 checks that Congress had previously approved.

Why it matters: The measure is unlikely to pass the GOP-controlled Senate, but could further divide President Trump and Republicans ahead of the crucial Senate runoffs in Georgia next week.