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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Consumers consistently say they want more privacy, but they don't do much about it.

Why it matters: That's the contradiction buried within the privacy debate. Survey after survey suggest that consumers care about preserving whatever privacy they have left — but few actually take steps to share less or delete the troves of data being collected about them online.

  • The reality is that the services collecting that data are now large and essential to everyday life — and managing our data (and who gets access to it) is overwhelmingly complicated.
  • So consumers, despite their outrage, tend to shrug and make do with the status quo.

By the numbers: 92% of consumers say they should be able to control the information about them on the internet, per a recent PricewaterhouseCoopers report. And 71% say they'd stop doing business with a company for giving away their sensitive data without permission.

  • Yet despite high awareness of data scandals, an IBM survey showed most consumers don't take consequential action in response.
  • Less than half (45%) updated privacy settings. Only 16% stopped doing business with an impacted company, and only 18% deleted a social media account.
  • Most people say it's important to have a clear understanding of a company's privacy policy before signing up — but in practice, most people skip right to the "I agree" box without actually reading it, according to an Axios-SurveyMonkey poll.
"People say they're worried, but they don't vote with their fingers, so to speak."
— Jay Cline, PwC Privacy Leader

Case in point: Cline notes that even when legally mandated privacy protections are available, the response rates are low. For example, few consumers use their HIPAA rights to get access to medical records, or use the option under the law to delete medical records.

  • And the opt-out rates for marketing blasts are incredibly low — under 2%.

The big picture: "Some of these companies have so much power that we don't have much choice but to use their services — and we can't use these services without giving something up," said Jennifer King, director of privacy at Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society.

Yes, but: Although the numbers are relatively small, consumers are starting to use privacy-conscious tools like ad blockers, virtual private networks and encryption. Google says 20 million people access the "My Accounts" hub that houses privacy and security settings every day.

What's next: California's privacy law, which takes effect next January, will be a litmus test for how badly consumers really want privacy as well as for major companies' willingness to grant the same rights to users outside of the state.

  • "The question of how many people are going to try to express their rights for the first time is really important," said PwC's Cline.

Go deeper

Updated 26 mins ago - Politics & Policy

The massive early vote

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Early voting in the 2020 election across the U.S. on Saturday had already reached 65.5% of 2016's total turnout, according to state data compiled by the U.S. Elections Project.

Why it matters: The coronavirus pandemic and its resultant social-distancing measures prompted a massive uptick in both mail-in ballots and early voting nationwide, setting up an unprecedented and potentially tumultuous count in the hours and days after the polls close on Nov. 3.

Updated 49 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Ipsos poll: COVID trick-or-treat.
  2. World: Greece tightens coronavirus restrictions as Europe cases spike — Austria reimposes coronavirus lockdowns amid surge of infections
  3. Economy: Conference Board predicts economy won’t fully recover until late 2021.
  4. Technology: Fully at-home rapid COVID test to move forward.
  5. States: New York rolls out new testing requirements for visitors.

Trump's legacy is shaped by his narrow interests

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

President Trump's policy legacy is as much defined by what he's ignored as by what he's involved himself in.

The big picture: Over the past four years, Trump has interested himself in only a slim slice of the government he leads. Outside of trade, immigration, a personal war against the "Deep State" and the hot foreign policy issue of the moment, Trump has left many of his Cabinet secretaries to work without interruption, let alone direction.