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Expand chart
Data: C-SPAN; Chart: Harry Stevens/Axios

Look at this slide in how activist Congress was in 2010 and 2018 —both second years of presidential terms, with the president's party controlling both chambers.

What's happened: Dr. Robert Browning, executive director of the C-SPAN archives and a Purdue University professor, found in his end-of-year congressional statistics that Congress is meeting less, taking fewer votes and passing fewer laws.

At noon today, that clogged Congress is being disrupted, with Democrats taking over the House due to victories by activist, restive, insistent freshmen who will change both the face and tone of official Washington.

  • Beginning during orientation, we have already seen that this class is "not asking permission to do things," as Rep. Ben Ray Luján (D-N.M.), who helped elect many of them as the House Dems' campaign chairman, told the WashPost.

Only one out of the 36 newly elected female House members is Republican (Carol Miller of West Virginia), according to an analysis by Malliga Och of Idaho State University and Shauna Shames of Rutgers University:

  • "The number of Republican women in [the House] is actually dropping from 23 to 13."

"The 116th Congress will be the most diverse in U.S. history: 126 women will take office, including 43 women of color."

Go deeper: The 2018 midterm election races that made history

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Go deeper

Updated 32 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Inauguration Day dashboard

Screenshot: Fox News

President Trump has delivered a farewell speech and departed Washington for the last time on Air Force One, kicking off the day that will culminate with President-elect Joe Biden taking office.

What's next: The inaugural celebration for young Americans is being livestreamed, starting at 10am.

Updated 48 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Trump departs on final Air Force One flight

President Trump and his family took off on Air Force One at 9 a.m. on Wednesday morning for the final time en route to Florida.

The big picture: Trump's final hours as president were punctuated by his decisions to snub his successor's inauguration and grant pardons to many of his allies who have been swept up in corruption scandals.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
2 hours ago - Economy & Business

Janet Yellen said all the right things to reassure the markets

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Treasury Secretary nominee and former Fed chair Janet Yellen's confirmation hearing before the Senate Finance Committee on Tuesday showed markets just what they can expect from the administration of President-elect Joe Biden: more of what they got under President Trump — at least for now.

What it means: Investors and big companies reaped the benefits of ultralow U.S. interest rates and low taxes for most of Trump's term as well as significant increases in government spending, even before the coronavirus pandemic.