Photos: Getty Images

The first Muslim congresswoman, first openly gay man elected governor, youngest woman ever elected to Congress, and more history was made Tuesday night in the midterm races.

The big picture: This was already teed up to be a major election, with Democrats poised to take the House and the country having the first chance since 2016 to send a message to Congress. But individual races opened the door for more diversity in national politics.

Ilhan Omar, first Somali-American congresswoman
Graphic: Rebecca Zisser/Axios
Rashida Tlaib, first Muslim congresswoman
Graphic: Rebecca Zisser/Axios
Jared Polis, first openly gay man to win a governor race
Graphic: Rebecca Zisser/Axios
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, youngest women ever elected
Graphic: Rebecca Zisser/Axios
Sharice Davids, first lesbian Native American in Congress
Graphic: Rebecca Zisser/Axios
Chris Pappas, New Hampshire's first openly gay member of Congress
Graphic: Rebecca Zisser/Axios
Deb Haaland, first Native American woman in the House
Graphic: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

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Updated 13 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 8 a.m. ET: 33,137,748 — Total deaths: 998,372 — Total recoveries: 22,952,164Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 8 a.m. ET: 7,116,456 — Total deaths: 204,762 — Total recoveries: 2,766,280 — Total tests: 101,298,794Map.
  3. States: 3 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week
  4. Health: The childless vaccine. The long-term pain of the mental health pandemic
  5. World: India the second country after U.S. to hit 6 million cases
Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
30 mins ago - Economy & Business

Big Tech's share of the S&P 500 reached record level in August

Expand chart
Reproduced from The Leuthold Group; Chart: Axios Visuals

The gap between the weighting of the five largest companies in the S&P 500 and the 300 smallest rose to the highest ever at the end of August, according to data from the Leuthold Group.

Why it matters: The concentration of wealth in a few massive U.S. tech companies has reached a scale significantly greater than it was before the dot-com bubble burst.

Fortune 100 companies commit $3.3 billion to fight racism and inequality

Data: Fortune 500, Axios analysis of company statements, get the data; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon, Naema Ahmed/Axios

Big businesses continue to push funding toward fighting inequality and racism, with the 100 largest U.S. companies' monetary commitments rising to $3.33 billion since the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police earlier this year, according to an Axios analysis.

Why it matters: The continued pace of funding commitments shows that months after Floyd's death there remains pressure for the wealthiest corporations to put their money behind social issues and efforts.