A tour operator, wearing a protective mask, gestures as he leads a tour near the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., March 9. Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Reps. Eric Swalwell (D-Calif.) and Rick Crawford (R-Ark.) are reintroducing a 2013 bill that would enable members of Congress to virtually participate in committee hearings and vote remotely on suspension bills from their home districts amid the coronavirus outbreak, according to an advanced copy of the press release obtained by Axios.

Why it matters: Congress, which is tasked with governing the country out of the coronavirus crisis, could quickly become a dangerous place for members and staffers, many of whom are over the age of 60 — the age group the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has advised to stay home as much as possible.

  • Millions of visitors also pass through Capitol Hill each year. As of this afternoon, visitors are still allowed in the building.
  • Meanwhile, several members of Congress — including Sen. Ted Cruz and Reps. Paul Gosar, Matt Gaetz, Doug Collins and Julia Brownley — have placed themselves under self-quarantine after interacting with individuals who have tested positive for the virus.

Details: The "Members Operating to Be Innovative and Link Everyone (MOBILE) Resolution" would create a secure, remote voting system for members to vote on suspension bills, which are generally noncontroversial bills that require a two-thirds vote to pass.

Worth noting: Swalwell has introduced and failed to pass the MOBILE Resolution every Congress since the 113th (2013–2015), so the measure faces an uphill battle.

  • But the ongoing concerns of safety surrounding the coronavirus may change the voting dynamics. Members of Congress have been floating ideas on how to continue legislating while also prioritizing their health.

What they're saying:

  • “Modern technology belongs in Congress and my resolution would allow Members to not only spend more time with their constituents and their families, but would prove useful for a number of situations, including the public health crisis in which we currently find ourselves,” Swalwell said.
  • “The ability for Members of Congress to vote remotely if need be has been technologically feasible for decades,” said Crawford. “The ongoing coronavirus outbreak underscores the need for Congress to embrace what the 21st Century has to offer.”

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