Supreme Court Justice nominee Amy Coney Barrett is sworn in during the Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing. Photo: Shawn Thew-Pool/Getty Images

Senators seem to be on the same page on Supreme Court Justice nominee Amy Coney Barrett after Day 1 of the confirmation hearings.

Why it matters: Republicans appear to have the votes to confirm Barrett before the election, and both parties are turning her confirmation into a get-out-the-vote effort.

  • Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.): "This is probably not about persuading each other unless something really dramatic happens. ... All the Republicans will vote yes, all the Democrats will vote no.”
  • Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.): "[W]e do not have some secret, clever, procedural way to stop this sham. Let's be honest."
  • It's "probably not going to be some brilliant cross-examination that is going to change the trajectory of this nomination," Klobuchar said.

The big picture: Democrats repeatedly claimed that the Affordable Care Act would be in jeopardy with Barrett on the court — pointing to the president's tweets and his prior judicial nominees as evidence.

Sen. Kamala Harris appeared virtually, accusing Republicans of "jamming" through the confirmation process.

  • Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah) appeared in person, 10 days after announcing he tested positive for COVID-19.

The bottom line: Barrett cited former Justices Sandra Day O’Connor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg as role models.

  • “I was 9 years old when Sandra Day O’Connor became the first woman to sit in this seat."
  • “When I was 21 years old and just beginning my career ... Ruth Bader Ginsburg sat in this seat. ... I have been nominated to fill Justice Ginsburg’s seat, but no one will ever take her place.”

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