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A protester stands over a toppled statue of President Theodore Roosevelt during an Indigenous Peoples Day of Rage protest in Portland, Oregon, on Sunday night. Photo: Nathan Howard/Getty Images

Anti-colonization demonstrators in Portland, Oregon, pulled down statues of the late Presidents Abraham Lincoln and Theodore Roosevelt ahead of the Columbus Day federal holiday, per the Oregonian.

Driving the news: Sunday night's action that also saw Oregon Historical Society's building vandalized was part of a movement that organizers called, "Indigenous Peoples Day of Rage." The protests continued elsewhere in the U.S. Monday, with monuments defaced or torn down in Chicago and Santa Fe, New Mexico.

A tweet previously embedded here has been deleted or was tweeted from an account that has been suspended or deleted.
  • Portland Police declared a riot and later made three arrests following the unrest.

Of note: The Portland demonstrators sprayed the bottom of his statute the words "Dakota 38," in reference to the number of Dakota Native Americans executed in 1862 after being accused of slaying white settlers.

  • The hangings, which occurred while Lincoln was president, marked the biggest mass execution in U.S. history, per the New York Times.
  • Roosevelt supported eugenics, the NYT notes. He was quoted as saying, "I don't go so far as to think that the only good Indians are dead Indians, but I believe nine out of 10 are, and I shouldn’t like to inquire too closely into the case of the 10th."

Zoom in: In Santa Fe, New Mexico, protesters pulled down an obelisk honoring what the inscription called "heroes" who died battling "savage Indians," the Albuquerque Journal reports. Two men were arrested over the protest.

  • In Chicago, a logo statue of the Blackhawks ice hockey team depicting Native American leader Black Hawk outside the United Center was being sent for repair after it was defaced early Monday with words including "land back," per the Chicago Sun-Times.

What they're saying: Santa Fe protest organizers said in a statement to news outlets that every day is Indigenous People's Day, "and we are here to remind the world that this is, was, and always will be Indigenous [homelands], and we will do what is necessary to protect it."

The other side: President Trump did not respond to the Santa Fe or Chicago protests, but on Portland, he tweeted, "The Radical Left fools in Portland don’t want any help from real Law Enforcement which we will provide instantaneously. Vote!"

The big picture: Dozens of Confederate statues and symbols have been torn down or removed in the U.S. and around the world in response to Black Lives Matter protests against police brutality and racism this year.

  • Trump signed an executive order in June to denounce protesters who had defaced Civil War and World War II monuments.
A tweet previously embedded here has been deleted or was tweeted from an account that has been suspended or deleted.

Go deeper: Dozens of Confederate symbols removed in wake of George Floyd's death

Editor's note: This article has been updated with news of the Chicago protest.

Go deeper

Descendant of Robert E. Lee decries Confederate flag at Capitol

A man carries the Confederate flag outside the Senate Chamber on Wednesday. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The Rev. Rob Lee, a descendant of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, says the presence of the Confederate flag inside the U.S. Capitol this week was an "attack on democracy."

Why it matters: Historians say the flag — a symbol of white supremacy and racial segregation — never entered the Capitol with such fanfare during the Civil War. It was seen many times Wednesday in possession of white rioters who waved it without interference from police.

Air quality alerts issued as California fires threaten more sequoias

The Windy Fire blazes through the Long Meadow Grove of giant sequoia trees near the Trail of 100 Giants in Sequoia National Forest, near California Hot Springs, on Tuesday. Photo: David McNew/Getty Images

Two wildfires were threatening California's sequoia trees over overnight, hours after authorities issued fresh evacuation orders and warnings, along with air quality alerts on Wednesday.

The big picture: Officials in the Bay Area and the San Joaquin Valley issued air quality alerts as smoke from the Windy and KNP Complex fires resulted in hazy, "ash-filled" skies from Fresno to Tulare, the Los Angeles Times notes.

Asymptomatic Florida students exposed to COVID no longer have to quarantine

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis during a September news conference in Viera, Fla. Photo: Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) announced Wednesday an emergency order allowing parents to decide whether their children should quarantine or stay in school if they're exposed to COVID-19, provided they're asymptomatic.

Why it matters: People infected with COVID-19 can spread the coronavirus starting from two days before they display symptoms, according to the CDC. Quarantine helps prevent the virus' spread.

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