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Photo: Kevin Mazur / Getty Images for NARAS

North Dakota Sen. Heidi Heitkamp said Hillary Clinton can't go away "soon enough" while speaking with local radio station KFGO. The host, Heitkamp's brother, asked when Clinton will "ride off into the sunset." Heitkamp responded simply: "Not soon enough."

Why it matters: Similar to the trend of Republican candidates distancing themselves from President Trump, Heitkamp joins a growing list of vulnerable Democrats up for re-election this year who don't want to be viewed as Clinton Democrats.

The backdrop: The backlash comes after a recent speech Clinton gave in India, in which she declared she "won the places that represent two-thirds of America's gross domestic product." She clarified her areas of support as "the places that are optimistic, diverse, dynamic, moving forward."

Other Democrats criticizing Clinton's comments:

  • Sen. Sherrod Brown of Ohio told Huffington Post: "I don't really care what she said. I just think that that's not helpful."
  • Sen. Claire McCaskill of Missouri told reporters on Capitol Hill "Oh, come on. You're killing me here," according to WashPost.
  • Patty Solis Doyle, Clinton's 2008 campaign manager, per CNN: "Look, this was bad. I can't sugarcoat it. She was wrong and clearly it's not helpful to Democrats going into the midterms and certainly not going into 2020."

Go deeper: Warning signs for vulnerable Senate Democrats in 2018.

Go deeper

In cyber espionage, U.S. is both hunted and hunter

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

American outrage over foreign cyber espionage, like Russia's SolarWinds hack, obscures the uncomfortable reality that the U.S. secretly does just the same thing to other countries.

Why it matters: Secrecy is often necessary in cyber spying to protect sources and methods, preserve strategic edges that may stem from purloined information, and prevent diplomatic incidents.

1 hour ago - Politics & Policy
Scoop

White House plots "full-court press" for $1.9 trillion relief plan

National Economic Council director Brian Deese speaks during a White House news briefing. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Biden White House is deploying top officials to get a wide ideological spectrum of lawmakers, governors and mayors on board with the president’s $1.9 trillion COVID relief proposal, according to people familiar with the matter.

Why it matters: The broad, choreographed effort shows just how crucially Biden views the stimulus to the nation's recovery and his own political success.

1 hour ago - World

Scoop: Sudan wants to seal Israel normalization deal at White House

Burhan. Photo: Mazen Mahdi/AFP via Getty

Three months after Sudan agreed to normalize relations with Israel, it still hasn't signed an agreement to formally do so. Israeli officials tell me one reason has now emerged: Sudan wants to sign the deal at the White House.

Driving the news: Israel sent Sudan a draft agreement for establishing diplomatic relations several weeks ago, but the Sudanese didn’t reply, the officials say. On Tuesday, Israeli Minister of Intelligence Eli Cohen raised that issue in Khartoum during the first-ever visit of an Israeli minister to Sudan.