Photo: Thomas Dunne Books

President Trump is curious — and White House aides, alumni and reporters are anxious — ahead of the Jan. 29 publication of the tightly embargoed "Team of Vipers," a delicious, unsparing memoir by former Trump aide Cliff Sims.

Driving the news: ABC News has won a fiercely competitive effort to score the first broadcast interview with Sims, whose book deal was seven figures.

  • The author will sit down on "Good Morning America" with George Stephanopoulos, whose White House memoir, "All Too Human," was an inspiration for Sims.
  • Sims will also appear on "The View" and "Nightline," as well as other ABC platforms.
  • Sims has a massive media lineup for rollout week, including all cable networks and Stephen Colbert.

Details: The book is based on hundreds of pages of contemporaneous notes by the young Alabaman, who has a rare eye and ear for cinematic detail.

The Daily Beast reports: "A 2016 campaign veteran, Sims had enjoyed wide access in part due to his personal friendship with Trump. The two men were so close that the president affectionately called him 'my Cliff.'"

  • "[T]he president began asking associates in November if 'we lost Cliff?'"

According to a publishing source who has read the book: "No one emerges unscathed."

Go deeper: Trump's tweet by dictation

Go deeper

When and how to vote in all 50 states

Data: RepresentUS; Note: Montana has told counties they can opt into universal vote-by-mail; Map: Naema Ahmed/Axios

Millions of Americans who normally vote in person on election day will turn to early voting or mail-in ballots this fall — but that only works if you understand your state's election rules, deadlines and how to ensure your vote is counted.

Driving the news: Axios is launching an interactive resource, built on research by RepresentUs, a nonpartisan election reform group, to help voters across the country to get the information they need.

The pandemic real estate market

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

It's not just emotional buying, real estate agents say: There are smart and strategic reasons that Americans of all ages, races and incomes are moving away from urban centers.

Why it matters: Bidding wars, frantic plays for a big suburban house with a pool, buying a property sight unseen — they're all part of Americans' calculus that our lives and lifestyles have been permanently changed by coronavirus and that we'll need more space (indoors and out) for the long term.

44 mins ago - Health

Coronavirus cases are falling, but don't get too comfortable

Data: The COVID Tracking Project, state health departments; Map: Andrew Witherspoon, Danielle Alberti, Sara Wise/Axios

America's coronavirus outbreak is slowing down after a summer of explosive growth.

By the numbers: The U.S. is averaging roughly 52,000 new cases per day — still a lot of cases, but about 10.5% fewer than it was averaging last week.