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Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Having moved entirely online, this year's CES is unlike any other. However, there's still a ton of tech news to watch out for, and Axios has you covered with all the big news in one place.

The big picture: We are in the midst of both a pandemic and political upheaval, but that isn't stopping the biggest tech companies in the world from sharing their latest consumer gear. Here's the latest — check back all week for more from the Axios tech team.

Tuesday, Jan. 12
  • GM announced a new business unit, Brightdrop, to provide electric vehicles, software and services for delivery companies. FedEx is the first customer.
  • Gaming hardware specialist Razer created a tech-ified reusable N95 mask, complete with lights and voice projection.
  • Here, the company made up of the former Nokia Maps unit, announced it has created 3D maps of 75 cities. It's also working on electric vehicle route mapping and private mapping services.
  • Grill maker Weber is buying June, a startup known for its smart oven.
Monday, Jan. 11
Sunday, Jan. 10

Go deeper: For more on what to expect, check out this preview story.

Go deeper

Jan 15, 2021 - Economy & Business

The cloud-based car is arriving

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

The notion of the car as a "computer on wheels" is moving past the realm of hype and closer to reality, which will transform the driving experience and improve road safety, too.

Why it matters: The arrival of long-promised technologies like 5G connectivity and new high-performance computers means cars will improve over time, instead of depreciating the minute they leave the dealer lot.

Off the Rails

Episode 8: The siege

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photos: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. Axios takes you inside the collapse of a president with a special series.

Episode 8: The siege. An inside account of the deadly insurrection at the Capitol on Jan. 6 that ultimately failed to block the certification of the Electoral College. And, finally, Trump's concession.

On Jan. 6, White House deputy national security adviser Matt Pottinger entered the West Wing in the mid-afternoon, shortly after his colleagues' phones had lit up with an emergency curfew alert from D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser.

17 mins ago - Technology

Tech companies worry about becoming targets

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Tech employees are on high alert about their own personal safety as their employers roll out policies to ban or limit the reach of far-right extremists angry over former President Donald Trump's defeat.

Why it matters: As tech companies impose aggressive policies after the Capitol riot, employees will be the target of vitriol from aggrieved people who think tech and the media are conspiring to silence Trump and conservatives more broadly.

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