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Photo: Ethan Miller/Getty Images

It was already shaping up to be a very strange CES this year, with the world's largest consumer tech show going virtual. Now, CES also has to compete with a constitutional crisis and worsening pandemic.

The big picture: The Consumer Technology Association, which puts on CES, has done its best to move the big press events and keynote online.

Yes, but: Much of what makes the show essential can't be replicated online: the formal and informal one-on-one meetings, the side conversations and parties.

  • That said, prepare for a flurry of tech product announcements this week.

Catch up quick:

  • A few products have already been announced, including new augmented reality smart glasses from Lenovo, a bending TV from LG, and some novel new laptops from HP.
  • Today is "media day," with a series of press conferences from the likes of Sony, Samsung, LG, Intel and Phillips.
  • The keynotes begin with Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg this afternoon. GM CEO Mary Barra, AMD chief Lisa Su and Best Buy CEO Corie Barry speak Tuesday. Microsoft president Brad Smith speaks Wednesday, as does Walmart CEO Doug McMillon.

Of note: This year's CES lineup is noticeably more diverse than in years' past, with three female CEOs speaking on Tuesday alone.

Meanwhile, the biggest single product announcement expected this week, Samsung's new Galaxy S21, is being unveiled at a separate online event Thursday.

The bottom line: CES will have to work next year to reclaim its position as a central gathering point for the tech industry. On the flip side, by next January, people may be so eager to meet they are happy to put up with the bad food and long cab lines that typically accompany the massive Vegas confab.

Go deeper

Jan 15, 2021 - Energy & Environment

GM finds love on Wall Street for a change

GM EV600 electric delivery truck. Photo: GM

General Motors is finding love on Wall Street, something it hasn't experienced in a very, very long time.

What's happening: Investors are beginning to give credence to the Detroit automaker's electric vehicle strategy — or they're looking for a cheaper way to participate in the Tesla-inspired run-up in electric vehicle stocks.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
10 mins ago - Economy & Business

First glimpse of the Biden market

Photo: Jonathan Ernst-Pool/Getty Images

Investors made clear what companies they think will be winners and which will be losers in President Joe Biden's economy on Wednesday, selling out of gun makers, pot purveyors, private prison operators and payday lenders, and buying up gambling, gaming, beer stocks and Big Tech.

What happened: Private prison operator CoreCivic and private prison REIT Geo fell by 7.8% and 4.1%, respectively, while marijuana ETF MJ dropped 2% and payday lenders World Acceptance and EZCorp each fell by more than 1%.

Mike Allen, author of AM
41 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Biden-Harris, Day 1: What mattered most

President Joe Biden and first lady Dr. Jill Biden arrive at the North Portico of the White House. Photo: Alex Brandon-Pool/Getty Images

The Axios experts help you sort significance from symbolism. Here are the six Day 1 actions by President Biden that matter most.

Driving the news: Today, on his first full day, Biden translates his promise of a stronger federal response to the pandemic into action — starting with 10 executive orders and other directives, Caitlin Owens writes.