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Census workers stand outside Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in New York City. Photo: Noam Galai/Getty Images

The Census Bureau said Friday it will continue its count through Oct. 31 as ordered by a federal judge, and not the end of next week as it previously indicated.

Driving the news: The statement came one day after U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh said the Census Bureau, as well as the Department of Commerce violated her Sept. 24 injunction order "in several ways" and "a flood of emails to the Court and the parties suggests ongoing non-compliance in the field."

  • The Sept. 24 injunction said the Census Bureau could not end the census a month early.
  • Koh on Thursday ordered the bureau to text message all of its employees, "notifying them of the Court’s Injunction Order, stating that the October 5, 2020 'target date; is not operative, and stating that data collection operations will continue through October 31, 2020."
  • She also ordered Census Bureau Director Steven Dillingham to file a declaration by Monday confirming that the agency was complying with the Sept. 24 order.
  • Koh threatened sanctions or contempt proceedings if the agency and its officials violated her order again.

What they're saying: In its statement on Friday, the Census Bureau said it sent the following statement to its its workers:

“As a result of court orders, the October 5, 2020 target date is not operative, and data collection operations will continue through October 31, 2020. Employees should continue to work diligently and enumerate as many people as possible. Contact your supervisor with any questions.”

Context: Koh's order on Thursday came after the Census Bureau tweeted that Wilber Ross, the Secretary of Commerce, "announced a target date of October 5, 2020 to conclude 2020 Census self-response and field data collection operations."

  • Koh said "the decision [to end the census early] also risks further undermining trust in the Bureau and its partners, sowing more confusion, and depressing Census participation."

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A federal judge has delayed the execution of Lisa Montgomery, the only woman on federal death row, ruling that the Department of Justice didn't follow the proper timeline under a previous court order, AP reports.

Why it matters: Under the order, Bureau of Prisons cannot reschedule Montgomery’s execution until at least Jan. 1, potentially setting up an execution date after President-elect Joe Biden takes office on Jan. 20.

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Haines. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Image

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Why it matters: Haines is the first of President Biden's nominees to receive a full Senate confirmation and she will be the first woman to serve as DNI. She's previously served as CIA deputy director from 2013 to 2015 and deputy national security adviser from 2015 to 2017.