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Census workers outside Lincoln Center in New York. Photo: Noam Galai/Getty Images

A federal judge ruled late Thursday that the Trump administration could not end the 2020 census a month early.

Why it matters: The decision states that an early end — on Sept. 30, instead of Oct. 31 — would likely produce inaccuracies and thus impact political representation and government funding around the country.

  • The judge in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California issued a preliminary injunction in the case.
  • Experts believed that the shortened census, which was already delayed for months amid the coronavirus pandemic, would lead to undercounts nationwide, especially in low-income and remote areas that have been slower to respond.

The big picture: The administration had argued that the speedup was necessary in order to meet a Dec. 31 deadline that would have seen census data turned over to the federal government to begin processing congressional allocations.

Read the ruling.

Go deeper

Updated Nov 5, 2020 - Politics & Policy

USPS finds 815 remaining ballots in court-mandated sweeps in Texas

Photo: George Frey/Getty Images

The U.S. Postal Service on Wednesday found 815 remaining ballots in court-ordered sweeps in several Texas facilities, according to a federal court filing. They have now been delivered to election officials,

The big picture: U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan set a deadline on Wednesday to have USPS sweep facilities in Texas for outstanding ballots and have them delivered to election officials by 5 p.m. local time.

Updated 12 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Health: Most vulnerable Americans aren't getting enough vaccine information — Fauci says Trump administration's lack of facts on COVID "very likely" cost lives.
  2. Politics: Biden unveils "wartime" COVID strategyBiden's COVID-19 bubble.
  3. Vaccine: Florida requiring proof of residency to get vaccine — CDC extends interval between vaccine doses for exceptional cases.
  4. World: Hong Kong to put tens of thousands on lockdown as cases surge.
  5. Sports: 2021 Tokyo Olympics hang in the balance.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck.

Trump impeachment trial to start week of Feb. 8, Schumer says

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: The Washington Post via Getty

The Senate will begin former President Trump's impeachment trial the week of Feb. 8, Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Friday on the Senate floor.

The state of play: Schumer announced the schedule after reaching an agreement with Republicans. The House will transmit the article of impeachment against the former president late Monday.