Dec 6, 2019

The physical danger of screen time

Photo: Tim Robberts/Getty Images

Cellphone-related injuries have skyrocketed over the last decade, according to a new study in JAMA Otolaryngology.

By the numbers: Nearly 40% of injuries between January 1998 and December 2017 were among people ages 13 to 29, and many of them were "associated with common activities, such as texting while walking."

  • Lacerations, contusions and abrasions were the most common diagnoses.

The rise of the smartphone, particularly the iPhone️, was apparently pretty dangerous.

  • "Providing constant access to a variety of applications and internet browsers, these devices have become a necessary but potentially dangerous tool used by most people in the United States," the study's authors write.

Go deeper: Youth tobacco use highest in 19 years

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Gun violence survivors experience increased risk of mental harm

Photo: Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Many survivors of gun violence are prone to post-traumatic stress disorder, increased alcohol and drug abuse, and unemployment up to years after their physical wounds heal and even when the injuries are minor, a JAMA study released on Wednesday illustrates.

Why it matters: Far more people in the U.S. survive gunshot wounds than those who are killed by firearm injuries.

Go deeperArrowNov 20, 2019

Study: Smartphone use spikes anxiety, depression in 25% of youth

Illustration: Axios Visuals/Sarah Grillo

Roughly 25% of youths experience depression, anxiety, poor sleep and high stress due to "problematic smartphone use," according to new research published Friday in BMC Psychiatry.

Why it matters: The report says that how young people use smartphones — in ways that mimic behavioral addiction — could be more harmful for mental health than the phones themselves.

Go deeperArrowNov 29, 2019

A shareable helmet with your shared bike

Helmets locked on the rear fender of e-bikes. Photo: Courtesy of Wheels

Micromobility provider Wheels — whose shared scooter-bikes aim to make riding safer with bigger wheels, a lower center of gravity and the ability to stand or sit — is now outfitting them with a shareable smart helmet.

Why it matters: Riding a scooter or bike without a helmet is like driving in a car without a seatbelt, but nobody wants to carry around a helmet all day for a quick jaunt. By making it easier — and more sanitary — to use a shared helmet, these micromobility devices could become safer.

Go deeperArrowDec 10, 2019