Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

A different strain of Salmonella (red) invades cultured human cells. Photo: Media for Medical/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday it is "concerned" about a new multidrug-resistant strain of Salmonella that killed 2 and sickened 255 people from June 2018 to March 2019.

Why it matters: Experts have sounded the alarm over growing antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in the U.S. and globally.

"This is an example of the type of outbreak that we would argue would only increase in frequency and magnitude as time goes on."
— Greg Frank, head of new advocacy coalition Working to Fight AMR

Driving the news: The "CDC is concerned about an increase in human illness from a new strain of multidrug-resistant Salmonella Newport that appears to have spread from cattle in the U.S. and Mexico," according to its press release.

  • This strain shows either partial or complete resistance to 2 of the most common antibiotics: azithromycin and ciprofloxacin, per the Aug. 23 MMWR report.
  • During that time period, for patients with available info, 60 were hospitalized, 4 were admitted to the intensive care unit, and 2 died. 43% reported the illness after travel to Mexico.
  • The food-borne illness was linked to Mexican-style soft cheese obtained in Mexico and beef obtained in the U.S.

Context: This is one example of the dire threat posed by all AMR, one that could be killing up to 162,044 people in the U.S. every year — which would make it the third leading cause of death, says Frank. (The CDC is updating its AMR report this fall, but its last report from 2013 shows annual U.S. deaths were "at least 23,000 people.")

  • AMR is growing for multiple reasons, including a lack of return on investment.
  • Frank points to Achaogen, which had received approval of an important new antibiotic targeting a superbug, but recently had to declare bankruptcy after it only made $1 million in its first 6 months on the market.

What's next: Frank, who also is the director of infectious disease policy at the Biotechnology Innovation Organization, says the new coalition was formed to raise public awareness of the growing threat from AMR.

  • The coalition also advocates for policies promoting the development of new antibiotics under a stewardship program to ensure appropriate use — and is watching bills recently introduced to the Senate: the DISARM Act and the STAAR Act.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Ipsos poll: COVID trick-or-treat.
  2. World: Greece tightens coronavirus restrictions as Europe cases spike.
  3. Economy: Conference Board predicts economy won’t fully recover until late 2021.
  4. Education: Surge threatens to shut classrooms down again.
  5. Technology: Fully at-home rapid COVID test to move forward.
  6. Travel: CDC replaces COVID-19 cruise ban with less restrictive "conditional sailing order."

Trump's legacy is shaped by his narrow interests

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

President Trump's policy legacy is as much defined by what he's ignored as by what he's involved himself in.

The big picture: Over the past four years, Trump has interested himself in only a slim slice of the government he leads. Outside of trade, immigration, a personal war against the "Deep State" and the hot foreign policy issue of the moment, Trump has left many of his Cabinet secretaries to work without interruption, let alone direction.

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
5 hours ago - Technology

AI and automation are creating a hybrid workforce

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

AI and automation are receiving a boost during the coronavirus pandemic that in the short term is creating a new hybrid workforce rather than destroying jobs outright.

The big picture: While the forces of automation and AI will eliminate some jobs and create some new ones, the vast majority will remain but be dramatically changed. The challenge for employers will be ensuring workforces are ready for the effects of technology.