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National guard outside the Capitol. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

An internal memo by an FBI office in Virginia warned of violence and "war" at the Capitol on Jan. 6, the Washington Post reports, raising further questions about failures to secure the Capitol from pro-Trump rioters.

Why it matters: The report goes against a statement from the head of the FBI’s Washington Field Office, Steven D’Antuono, on Friday claiming there was "no indication" of any planned attacks that day, the Post says.

  • The memo cited online plans to attack.
  • The memo quotes specific calls for violence: "Be ready to fight. Congress needs to hear glass breaking, doors being kicked in, and blood from their BLM and Pantifa slave soldiers being spilled. Get violent. ... We get our President or we die. NOTHING else will achieve this goal.”

The big picture: Multiple investigations have been launched into law enforcement's handling of last week's breach at the Capitol. Demonstrators infiltrating the Capitol caused mass evacuations and five confirmed deaths.

What to watch: The FBI issued another memo this week warning that "armed protests" are being planned at all 50 state capitols and in D.C. ahead of the inauguration.

Go deeper

Off the Rails

Episode 8: The siege

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photos: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. Axios takes you inside the collapse of a president with a special series.

Episode 8: The siege. An inside account of the deadly insurrection at the Capitol on Jan. 6 that ultimately failed to block the certification of the Electoral College. And, finally, Trump's concession.

On Jan. 6, White House deputy national security adviser Matt Pottinger entered the West Wing in the mid-afternoon, shortly after his colleagues' phones had lit up with an emergency curfew alert from D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser.

Tech digs in for long domestic terror fight

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

With domestic extremist networks scrambling to regroup online, experts fear the next attack could come from a radicalized individual — much harder than coordinated mass events for law enforcement and platforms to detect or deter.

The big picture: Companies like Facebook and Twitter stepped up enforcement and their conversations with law enforcement ahead of Inauguration Day. But they'll be tested as the threat rises that impatient lone-wolf attackers will lash out.

The pandemic could be worsening childhood obesity

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The 10-month long school closures and the coronavirus pandemic are expected to have a big impact on childhood obesity rates.

Why it matters: About one in five children are obese in the U.S. — an all-time high — with worsening obesity rates across income and racial and ethnic groups, data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey show.

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