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Rep. Tim Ryan during a hearing last May. Photo: Anna Moneymaker-Pool/Getty Images

An information gap following the Capitol assault has fueled fears among members of Congress that it was an inside job involving the Capitol Police.

Why it matters: The mass resignations by the Capitol Police chief and Senate and House sergeant-at-arms, coupled with few briefings by federal officials like the FBI, have left important questions unanswered and a lone Democratic congressman from Ohio trying to fill in the gaps.

Rep. Tim Ryan, chairman of a House Appropriations subcommittee overseeing the Capitol Police, has held three virtual briefings to update reporters.

  • On Monday, he shared the shocking news that two Capitol Police officers had been suspended and 10–15 were under investigation for their behavior during the riot.
  • "One was the selfie officer, and another was an officer who put a MAGA hat on and started directing people around,” Ryan said.
  • There hasn't been an official briefing or press conference from the Capitol Police since the attack.

A House Democratic aide told Axios that among other things discussed on their weekly caucus call this afternoon, members expressed “lots of anger and frustration about national security failures."

  • Rep. Jim Clyburn (D-S.C.) said Friday that something "untoward" had occurred after rioters seemingly went looking for him at an unmarked office separate from his main location in Statuary Hall emblazoned with his name.

The backdrop: Ryan and Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-Conn.) announced last Thursday that the Legislative Branch Appropriations subcommittee, which funds the Capitol Police, is actively investigating what happened.

  • They've been conducting several hearings and calls with law enforcement and military officials while working on a tight timeline to get more answers and implement changes/reforms for the inauguration.

The bottom line: The uncertainty comes as the clock ticks down to President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration in nine days.

Go deeper

Inauguration Day fashion includes body armor

Rep. Ann McLane Kuster, in blue, takes cover as rioters attempt to break in to the House Chamber on Jan. 6. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images

The fashion police were out in force on Inauguration Day, highlighting the purple hues worn by the former first ladies and the birdcage ring adorning one of poet Amanda Gorman's delicate fingers.

The intrigue: Rep. Ann McLane Kuster dressed in body armor.

29 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Biden's latest executive order: Buy American

President Joe R. Biden speaks about the economy before signing executive orders in the State Dining Room at the White House on Friday, Jan 22, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

President Joe Biden will continue his flurry of executive orders on Monday, signing a new directive to require the federal government to “buy American” for products and services.

Why it matters: The executive action is yet another attempt by Biden to accomplish goals administratively without waiting for the backing of Congress. The new order echoes Biden's $400 billion campaign pledge to increase government purchases of American goods.

Tech digs in for long domestic terror fight

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

With domestic extremist networks scrambling to regroup online, experts fear the next attack could come from a radicalized individual — much harder than coordinated mass events for law enforcement and platforms to detect or deter.

The big picture: Companies like Facebook and Twitter stepped up enforcement and their conversations with law enforcement ahead of Inauguration Day. But they'll be tested as the threat rises that impatient lone-wolf attackers will lash out.