Dec 9, 2019

McKinsey gives Buttigieg permission to release client list

Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Consulting firm McKinsey & Company will allow Mayor Pete Buttigieg to release the list of clients he served while working for the company from 2007 to 2010, the Buttigieg campaign confirmed Monday.

Why it matters: Buttigieg has faced increased scrutiny for his time at McKinsey, especially in light of reports that the powerful firm helped Immigration and Customs Enforcement find “detention savings opportunities,” among other controversial projects. Buttigieg, who says he was mostly "making a lot of spreadsheets and PowerPoints" during his short time at the company, had been blocked from discussing his clients by a confidentiality agreement.

The big picture: Buttigieg's work at the secretive firm has also put him at odds with 2020 rival Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who recently released her former client list from her time working in corporate and legal consulting.

  • Buttigieg responded to pressure from Warren and others to be more "transparent" by vowing to make his future fundraisers open to the press and to release a list of the people who are fundraising for him.
  • Buttigieg also released a timeline of his work at McKinsey last Friday. The mayor claims he's "never worked on a project inconsistent with [his] values."

What they're saying:

"[W]e recognize the unique circumstances presented by a presidential campaign. After receiving permission from the relevant clients, we have informed Mayor Buttigieg that he may disclose the identity of the clients he served while at McKinsey from 2007 to 2010. Any description of his work for those clients still must not disclose confidential, proprietary or classified information obtained during the course of that work, or violate any security clearance.
We can further confirm that the clients Mayor Buttigieg described in his statement on Friday, December 6 are all of the clients he served during his time at McKinsey."
— McKinsey spokesperson

Go deeper ... Podcast: Mayor Pete's McKinsey problem

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Al Sharpton says Floyd family will lead march on Washington in August

The family of George Floyd is teaming up with Rev. Al Sharpton to hold a march on Washington on Aug. 28 — the 57th anniversary of the civil rights movement's March on Washington — to call for a federal policing equality act, Sharpton announced during a eulogy at Floyd's memorial service in Minneapolis Thursday.

Why it matters: The news comes amid growing momentum for calls to address systemic racism in policing and other facets of society, after more than a week of protests and social unrest following the killing of Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer.

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Medical journal retracts study that fueled hydroxychloroquine concerns

Photo: George Frey/AFP via Getty Images

The Lancet medical journal retracted a study on Thursday that found that coronavirus patients who took hydroxychloroquine had a higher mortality rate and increased heart problem than those who did nothing, stating that the authors were "unable to complete an independent audit of the data underpinning their analysis."

Why it matters: The results of the study, which claimed to have analyzed data from nearly 96,000 patients on six continents, led several governments to ban the use of the anti-malarial drug for coronavirus patients due to safety concerns.

George Floyd updates

Text reading "Demilitarize the police" is projected on an army vehicle during a protest over the death of George Floyd in Washington, D.C.. early on Thursday. Photo: Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

All four former Minneapolis police officers have been charged for George Floyd’s death and are in custody, including Thomas Lane, J. Alexander Kueng and Tou Thao, who were charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter.

The latest: A judge Thursday set bail at $750,000 for each of three ex-officers, AP reports.