Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Photo: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, under review by the police watchdog over conflicts of interest allegations concerning American businesswoman Jennifer Arcuri when he was London mayor, told the BBC Sunday there's "no interest to declare."

Why it matters: Johnson could face a possible criminal investigation over the claims, first reported by the Sunday Times, as fresh allegations emerged Saturday night.

Catch up quick: The Sunday Times reported previously that Arcuri’s companies received 2 sponsorship grants from Johnson's promotional agency while he was mayor and a 3rd grant this year valued at £100,000 ($123,000) from a former ministerial colleague in the government’s Department for Digital, Culture and Sport.

  • Per the BBC, the office said in a letter to Johnson, "[I]t has been brought to my attention that you maintained a friendship with Ms Jennifer Arcuri and as a result of that friendship allowed Ms Arcuri to participate in trade missions and receive sponsorship monies in circumstances when she and her companies could not have expected otherwise to receive those benefits."

Fresh allegations: The Observer reported late Saturday that Arcuri loaned more than £700,000 ($860,000) to her tech firm just before it won a £100,000 government grant. "It is unclear where the money channelled to Hacker House, a start-up with hardly any income, came from," The Observer said. "This adds to the mystery swirling around the American businesswoman ... and raises further questions for the government."

  • The Sunday Times reported late Saturday that Arcuri told 4 friends that she had an affair with Johnson while he was mayor.
  • The news outlet said David Enrich, now the New York Times' finance editor, had been told of the alleged relationship by 2 of her friends when he was working for another paper and that this account was corroborated by other sources who had spoken to Arcuri.

Context: The Independent Office for Police Conduct is reviewing the report concerning Johnson's time as mayor from 2008 to 2016 because London's mayor is also the capital's police and crime commissioner, the BBC notes.

The big picture: Johnson has had a turbulent start to his premiership since being elected Conservative Party leader in July. He lost 6 votes in the Houses of Commons before suspending Parliament, which the Supreme Court ruled last Tuesday unlawful, prompting the legislature's return.

  • He's also lost the government's majority, and the Conservative Party expelled 21 lawmakers for voting to take control of the legislative agenda in an effort to stop him from forcing through a no-deal Brexit on Oct. 31.

Go deeper: The scramble to build barriers to Boris

Editor's note: This article has been updated with Johnson's comments.

Go deeper

Woman who allegedly stole laptop from Pelosi's office to sell to Russia is arrested

Photo: FBI

A woman accused of breaching the Capitol and planning to sell to Russia a laptop or hard drive she allegedly stole from Speaker Nancy Pelosi's office was arrested in Pennsylvania's Middle District Monday, the Department of Justice said.

Driving the news: Riley June Williams, 22, is charged with illegally entering the Capitol as well as violent entry and disorderly conduct. She has not been charged over the laptop allegation and the case remains under investigation, per the DOJ.

Biden will reverse Trump's attempt to lift COVID-related travel restrictions

Photo: Tasos Katopodis via Getty

The incoming Biden administration will reverse President Trump's last-minute order to lift COVID-19 related travel restrictions, Jen Psaki, the incoming White House press secretary, tweeted.

Why it matters: President Trump ordered entry bans lifted for travelers from the U.K., Ireland, Brazil and much of Europe to go into effect Jan. 26, but the Biden administration will "strengthen public health measures around international travel in order to further mitigate the spread of COVID-19," Jen Psaki said. Biden will be inaugurated on Wednesday, Jan. 20 and Trump will no longer be president by the time the order is set to go into effect.

Dominion sends cease and desist letter to My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell

Photo: Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Dominion Voting Systems on Monday sent a cease and desist letter to My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell over his spread of misinformation related to the 2020 election.

Why it matters: Trump and several of his allies have pushed false conspiracy theories about the company, leading Dominion to take legal action. It's suing pro-Trump lawyer Sidney Powell for defamation and $1.3 billion in damages, and a Dominion employee has sued Trump himself, OANN and Newsmax.