Photo: Ian Vogler-WPA Pool/Getty Images

In a national address on Monday, U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson became the latest world leader to order a nationwide lockdown in an effort to stop the spread of the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Johnson warned on Sunday that a surge of coronavirus cases over the next two weeks could cripple the country's National Health Service, and that the U.K. is only "a matter of weeks" behind Italy — now the site of the worst coronavirus outbreak in the world.

  • "I urge you, at this moment of national emergency, to stay at home, protect our NHS, and save lives," Johnson said.
  • The government will reassess the lockdown in three weeks.

Details: Johnson ordered all non-essential shops, playgrounds, libraries, gyms and places of worship to close, and banned public meetings of more than two people, which he said will be enforced by police. He said citizens can leave their homes for the following "very limited" reasons:

  • Shopping for basic necessities as "infrequently as possible"
  • One form of exercise a day
  • Medical need, to provide care or to help a vulnerable person
  • Traveling to and from essential work

Between the lines: This is a huge reversal from Johnson's original coronavirus strategy, which eschewed lockdowns and closures like those being implemented around Europe in favor of allowing millions to be infected to establish "herd immunity."

Go deeper: U.K. hedges its massive coronavirus gamble

Go deeper

Trump says he doesn't know who Proud Boys are after telling them to "stand by"

President Trump told reporters on Wednesday that he doesn't know who the "Proud Boys" are, after saying at the presidential debate last night that the far-right group should "stand back and stand by" in response to a question asking him to condemn white supremacists.

Why it matters: The comments set off outrage and calls for clarification from a number of Republican senators. After being asked several times on Wednesday whether he will condemn white supremacy, Trump responded: "I have always denounced any form — any form of any of that, you have to denounce. But I also — Joe Biden has to say something about antifa."

Updated 22 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 2:30 p.m. ET: 33,785,178 — Total deaths: 1,010,147 — Total recoveries: 23,448,934Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 2:30 p.m. ET: 7,210,067 — Total deaths: 206,494 — Total recoveries: 2,813,305 — Total tests: 103,155,189Map.
  3. Health: The coronavirus' alarming impact on the body.
  4. Business: Real-time data show economy's rebound slowing but still going.
  5. Sports: Steelers-Titans NFL game delayed after coronavirus outbreak.
Updated 34 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Tim Scott says Trump "misspoke" when he told Proud Boys to "stand by"

Photo: Bonnie Cash/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.) told reporters on Wednesday that he believes President Trump "misspoke" when he told the far-right "Proud Boys" group to "stand back and stand by" in response to a question about condemning white supremacy at the first presidential debate.

Catch up quick: Moderator Chris Wallace asked Trump on Tuesday, "Are you willing, tonight, to condemn white supremacists and militia groups and to say that they need to stand down?" Trump asked who specifically he should condemn, and then responded, "Proud Boys, stand back and stand by. But I'll tell you what, somebody's got to do something about antifa and the left."