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Photo: Ian Vogler-WPA Pool/Getty Images

In a national address on Monday, U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson became the latest world leader to order a nationwide lockdown in an effort to stop the spread of the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Johnson warned on Sunday that a surge of coronavirus cases over the next two weeks could cripple the country's National Health Service, and that the U.K. is only "a matter of weeks" behind Italy — now the site of the worst coronavirus outbreak in the world.

  • "I urge you, at this moment of national emergency, to stay at home, protect our NHS, and save lives," Johnson said.
  • The government will reassess the lockdown in three weeks.

Details: Johnson ordered all non-essential shops, playgrounds, libraries, gyms and places of worship to close, and banned public meetings of more than two people, which he said will be enforced by police. He said citizens can leave their homes for the following "very limited" reasons:

  • Shopping for basic necessities as "infrequently as possible"
  • One form of exercise a day
  • Medical need, to provide care or to help a vulnerable person
  • Traveling to and from essential work

Between the lines: This is a huge reversal from Johnson's original coronavirus strategy, which eschewed lockdowns and closures like those being implemented around Europe in favor of allowing millions to be infected to establish "herd immunity."

Go deeper: U.K. hedges its massive coronavirus gamble

Go deeper

Biden picks Warren allies to lead SEC, CFPB

Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden has selected FTC commissioner Rohit Chopra to be the next director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and Obama-era Wall Street regulator Gary Gensler to lead the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

Why it matters: Both picks are progressive allies of Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and viewed as likely to take aggressive steps to regulate big business.

The perils of organizing underground

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Researchers see one bright spot as far-right extremists turn to private and encrypted online platforms: Friction.

Between the lines: For fringe organizers, those platforms may provide more security than open social networks, but they make it harder to recruit new members.

Resurrecting Martin Luther King's office

King points to Selma, Alabama on a map at his Southern Christian Leadership Conference office in Atlanta in January 1965. Photo: Bettmann/Getty Contributor

Efforts to save the office where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., planned some of the most important moments of the civil rights movement are hitting roadblocks amid a political stalemate.

Why it matters: The U.S. Park Service needs to OK agreements so a developer restoring the historic Prince Hall Masonic Lodge in Atlanta — which once housed King's Southern Christian Leadership Conference — can tap into private funding and begin work.