Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden during the Democratic National Convention from the Chase Center on Aug. 20, 2020 in Wilmington, Delaware. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden will travel to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on Monday to make an address "on whether voters feel safe" in President Trump's America and offer his vision for a "better future," his campaign said in a statement.

Of note: The Biden campaign's announcement Sunday comes one day after the New York Times reported that the former vice president would be making a trip to "condemn violence, and to note that chaos has unfolded" on Trump's watch.

Our thought bubble, via Axios' Hans Nichols: Biden's plans to travel and directly address the violence is an indication that the campaign is worried about losing ground on the law and order issue.

The big picture: Biden has stepped up his rhetoric on civil unrest in the U.S. in recent days.

  • On Sunday, he issued a statement unequivocally condemning violence on all sides after a man was fatally shot the previous night during a clash between supporters of Trump and anti-racism protesters.
  • On Saturday, he told the National Guard Association of America in a virtual meeting, "You’ve been called out to help keep the peace as the country continues to struggle and overcome our racial justice crisis."
  • He also took a swipe at President Trump, saying: "I promise you, as president, I'll never put you in the middle of politics or personal vendettas. I’ll never use the military as a prop or as a private militia to violate rights of fellow citizens. That's not law and order. You don’t deserve that."

Go deeper: Top Democrats fear that protests could help Trump win

Editor's note: This article has been updated with the latest comments from Biden and Trump.

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The top Republicans who aren't voting for Trump in 2020

Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan said last week that he cannot support President Trump's re-election.

Why it matters: Hogan, a moderate governor in a blue state, joins other prominent Republicans who have publicly said they will either not vote for Trump's re-election this November or will back Biden.

Poll: Large majorities support Biden over Trump on major policy issues

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

As Election Day gets closer, Joe Biden leads President Trump by sizable margins on the major issues of the day, according to a national poll by The New York Times and Siena College.

Why it matters: With only two weeks to go before election day, there's little time for Trump make up the gap between he and Biden on the issues voters care deeply about. These include a new multi-trillion dollar stimulus program, mandatory mask-wearing, and a $2 trillion renewable energy package. Voters are also now evenly split on who will better manage the economy — a blow to Trump as he's led on the issue for much of the campaign.

Updated Oct 20, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Microphones will be muted during parts of Thursday's presidential debate

Photos: Jim Watson and Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The Commission on Presidential Debates adopted new measures on Monday to mute the microphones of President Trump and Joe Biden to allow each candidate two minutes of uninterrupted time per segment during Thursday night's debate.

Why it matters: During September's chaotic debate, Trump interrupted Biden 71 times, while Biden interrupted Trump 22 times.