Get the latest market trends in your inbox

Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic insights with the Axios Markets newsletter. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

If news organizations declare Joe Biden the mathematical president-elect, he plans to address the nation as its new leader, even if President Trump continues to fight in court, advisers tell Axios.

Why it matters: Biden advisers learned the lesson of 2000, when Al Gore hung back while George W. Bush declared victory in that contested election, putting the Democrat on the defensive while Bush acted like the winner.

So if Biden is declared the winner, he'll begin forming his government and looking presidential — and won't yield to doubts Trump might try to sow.

  • Biden's schedule for Tuesday includes a clue to this posture: He "will address the nation on Election Night in Wilmington, Delaware."

Biden campaign manager Jen O'Malley Dillon told reporters Monday that even if all the votes aren't counted tonight, the campaign should have "a very good sense of where we're headed":

  • "We're not really concerned about what Donald Trump says. ... We're going to use our data, our understanding of where this is headed, and make sure that the vice president is addressing the American people."

To show momentum, Biden may begin transition announcements quickly, starting with senior staff appointments.

  • That way, core aides won't have to worry about their own jobs, but will immediately be able to get to work.

Biden plans to adopt what one confidant called "a healing tone," and begin talking about the path forward in battling the coronavirus.

  • Look for Biden to embrace science, and talk up the role of Dr. Anthony Fauci, after Trump threatened Sunday to try to fire the trusted official.

From there, the transition would move with unprecedented speed:

  • Biden had eight years in the White House, and he's surrounded by aides with decades of government experience.
  • So the transition has made the most thorough agency-by-agency preparations in history, including offices no one's thinking about.

Biden has blueprints for staffing every single agency, and has extensive plans for executive orders, including ones to undo Trump actions.

  • Look for Biden to send all-business signals: He won't pack the courts, and is unlikely to push for repeal of the Senate's filibuster rule and its 60-vote requirement anytime soon.
  • Instead, look for Biden to push to pass as much as possible under the banner of budget reconciliation, which requires just a simple majority.

Go deeper: A safe, sane way to navigate election night — and beyond

Subscribe to Axios AM/PM for a daily rundown of what's new and why it matters, directly from Mike Allen.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Server error. Please try a different email.
Subscribed! Look for Axios AM and PM in your inbox tomorrow or read the latest Axios AM now.

Go deeper

Clyburn says Biden not naming enough Black Cabinet members

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Rep. James Clyburn (D-S.C.) told The Hill on Wednesday that Joe Biden has so far fallen short when it comes to appointing Black people to his Cabinet.

Why it matters: Clyburn, a Biden ally, played a crucial role in helping secure the president-elect's path to the White House during the Democratic primary. His endorsement was pivotal in reviving the former VP's campaign when it appeared to be flailing.

Tony Hsieh, longtime Zappos CEO, dies at 46

Tony Hsieh. Photo: FilmMagic/FilmMagic

Tony Hsieh, the longtime ex-chief executive of Zappos, died on Friday after being injured in a house fire, his lawyer told the Las Vegas Review-Journal. He was 46.

The big picture: Hsieh was known for his unique approach to management, and following the 2008 recession his ongoing investment and efforts to revitalize the downtown Las Vegas area.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
5 hours ago - Economy & Business

The unicorn stampede is coming

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Airbnb and DoorDash plan to go public in the next few weeks, capping off a very busy year for IPOs.

What's next: You ain't seen nothing yet.