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Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Joe Biden told CBS' "60 Minutes" this week that, if elected, he would put together a bipartisan commission to study the federal court system and make recommendations for reform.

Why it matters: Biden has come under pressure to clarify his position on court packing after some Democrats suggested expanding the court if Senate Republicans confirm President Trump's Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett.

What he's saying: "If elected, what I will do is I'll put together a national commission of  — bipartisan commission of scholars, constitutional scholars, Democrats, Republicans, liberal, conservative," Biden told "60 Minutes" in an interview conducted on Monday.

  • "I will ask them to over 180 days come back to me with recommendations as to how to reform the court system because it's getting out of whack — the way in which it's being handled and it's not about court packing."
  • "There's a number of other things that our constitutional scholars have debated and I've looked to see what recommendations that commission might make." 
  • "There's a number of alternatives that are — go well beyond packing. ... The last thing we need to do is turn the Supreme Court into just a political football, whoever has the most votes gets whatever they want. Presidents come and go. Supreme Court justices stay for generations."  

Between the lines: Biden had previously opposed court packing during the Democratic primaries, but Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death and Barrett's nomination re-energized support for the idea among progressives.

  • Last week, he said during a town hall that he would come out with a clear position on court packing by Election Day, but that his answer on the issue will depend on how Barrett's confirmation is "handled."

Go deeper

Romney on impeachment: "It's pretty clear that the effort is constitutional."

Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) said on CNN's "State of the Union" he believes the impeachment trial is constitutional, despite former President Trump no longer being in office.

Driving the news: Some Republicans have objected to hearing the impeachment trial in the Senate, saying it would be unconstitutional to convict a former president.

Acting Capitol Police chief: Phone logs show Jan. 6 National Guard approval was delayed

Pittman at a congressional tribute for fallen officer Brian Sicknick. Photo: Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty Images

Acting U.S. Capitol Police Chief Yogananda Pittman testified on Thursday that cell phone records show former USCP Chief Steven Sund requested National Guard support from the House sergeant at arms as early as 12:58 p.m. on Jan. 6, but did not receive approval until over an hour later.

Why it matters: Sund and former House Sergeant at Arms Paul Irving clashed at a Senate hearing on Tuesday over a dispute in the timeline for when Capitol Police requested the National Guard during the Capitol insurrection.

Manhattan prosecutors reportedly obtain millions of pages of Trump's tax records

Photo: Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Manhattan district attorney is now in possession of millions of pages of former President Trump's tax and financial records, CNN first reported, following a Supreme Court ruling that allowed prosecutors to enforce a subpoena after a lengthy legal battle.

Why it matters: Trump fought for years to keep his tax returns out of the public eye and away from prosecutors in New York, who are examining his business in a criminal investigation that was first sparked by hush-money payments made by Trump's former fixer Michael Cohen during the 2016 election.

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