Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Joe Biden again declined to say Thursday whether he would support expanding the Supreme Court if he wins the presidency and Democrats win the Senate, telling reporters that they'll find out when the election is over.

Why it matters: Some congressional Democrats, including Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.), have suggested expanding the court if Senate Republicans confirm Trump's Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett during an election year — which they refused to do for former President Obama's nominee in 2016.

What they're saying: "You'll know my opinion on court packing when the election is over," Biden said Thursday.

  • "You know, the moment I answer that question, the headline in every one of your papers will be about that, other than focusing on what's happening now. The election has begun. There's never been a court appointment once an election has begun."

Context: President Trump and Republicans have claimed Biden would try to expand the court, despite the former vice president opposing the policy in the past. Biden, meanwhile, has remained tight-lipped on his position in recent weeks.

  • During the vice presidential debate on Wednesday, Vice President Pence criticized Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) — a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee — for not clarifying the campaign's position on the issue.

The big picture: The former vice president has also remained coy on whether he would work with congressional Democrats to abolish the Senate filibuster, another drastic reform supported by some in his party. He told the New York Times in July that it will "depend on how obstreperous they become,” referring to Republicans.

Go deeper

Jan 15, 2021 - Politics & Policy

Democrats call on Schumer for speedy Trump impeachment trial

Incoming Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Democrats are in a dilemma of their own making, and now they want incoming Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer to wrap up President Trump's impeachment trial as fast as possible, two sources familiar with the discussions tell Axios.

Why it matters: The party wanted to hold the president accountable for helping incite last week's Capitol attack but the actual mechanism for doing so — a Senate trial — is a balky tool that will inhibit President-elect Joe Biden from launching his effort to heal the country and its economy.

Jan 15, 2021 - Politics & Policy

⏱️ Impeachment tick-tock

Chief Justice John Roberts swears in senators for President Trump's first impeachment. Photo: Senate Television via Getty Images

Here’s your guide to President Trump’s second impeachment trial. Remember, his first began almost exactly a year ago, on Jan. 16, 2020.

The state of play: Assuming the House sends the article of impeachment to the Senate on or before Jan. 19 (the day the Senate returns from recess):

Updated Jan 13, 2021 - Politics & Policy

Trump becomes first president to be impeached twice

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The House voted 232-197 to impeach President Trump for “incitement of insurrection" after a violent pro-Trump mob breached the U.S. Capitol last week while Congress met to count the Electoral College vote.

Why it matters: Trump is now the only president in history to have been impeached twice — his first impeachment happened just over a year ago in December of 2019. He has just one week left in his term before President-elect Biden is sworn-in on Jan. 20.

You’ve caught up. Now what?

Sign up for Mike Allen’s daily Axios AM and PM newsletters to get smarter, faster on the news that matters.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!