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Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden will meet with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D) in Wilmington, Delaware, on Friday, Axios has confirmed.

The state of play: Biden has spoken to the Democratic leadership since his projected election victory. But Friday's scheduled meeting, which was first reported by Bloomberg, will be the first in-person gathering between the three since the election.

The big picture: The meeting comes as Biden's team continues to navigate the transition without having access to intelligence briefings and agency information.

  • GSA Administrator Emily Murphy, a Trump political appointee, has not made the declaration — a so-called "ascertainment" — that would allow officials from Biden’s agency review teams access to the information they need in order to get to work.
  • After holding a virtual meeting with the National Governors Association’s leadership team on Thursday afternoon, Biden said his team has not been able to "get access to information we need to be able to deal with everything from testing and guidance to the all important issue of vaccines, distributions and vaccinations."
  • “We haven’t been able to get into Operation Warp Speed but we will take what we learned today and build it into our plan," he added.

Go deeper: Biden's Day 1 challenges:

Go deeper

Legacy civil rights groups: Biden's transition needs to include us

President-elect Joe Biden at the NAACP 110th National Convention last year. Photo: Bill Pugliano via Getty

Prominent civil rights leaders are concerned that President-elect Joe Biden is deciding his administration without their input, NBC News reported Tuesday.

Why it matters: As Biden looks to deliver his promise of forming a diverse administration, he will have to contend with different factions of the liberal movement that might pull him in different directions.

Trump pick for FCC advances in Senate

Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

The Senate Commerce Committee voted today to advance President Donald Trump's pick for the Federal Communications Commission, setting up the Senate to potentially deadlock the communications regulator at the start of the Biden administration.

Why it matters: Nathan Simington's confirmation would mean a 2-2 commission, giving Republicans the ability to stall Democratic policy initiatives such as restoring net neutrality rules until Biden is able to get a nominee of his own confirmed by the Senate.

Biden's economic team will write a new crisis playbook

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Joe Biden's economic team faces a daunting task helping the millions of Americans who have lost their jobs or otherwise been financially ravaged by the coronavirus. But most of them have first-hand crisis experience, dating back to when Barack Obama inherited a crumbling economy when he took office in 2009.

Why it matters: Most of President-elect Biden's economic nominees served in the Obama administration, and wish that they could have gone bigger to help America recover from the 2008 financial crisis. But it's not going to be easy for them to push through massive fiscal spending in 2021.