Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

Democratic presidential candidate Beto O'Rourke told Pod Save America Monday that he favors abolishing the filibuster in order to enact gun control legislation.

Why it matters: The former Texas congressman has been a vocal figure since a mass shooting at an El Paso Walmart left 22 dead on Saturday. The event has triggered renewed attention to gun control legislation, with a focus on two background check bills passed by the House but not yet heard in the Senate.

What he's saying: When asked if he would be open to a gun buyback program, O'Rourke said, "Yes, and I'm open to them right now as a candidate. It absolutely has to be a part of the conversation. And if at the end of the day it's going to save lives... then let's move forward and do it."

The big picture: Congress is on August recess, but leading Democrats and some Republicans are calling for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) to call the Senate back to session to hear the measures. McConnell is currently working from home while recovering from a fractured shoulder.

Go deeper: Where 2020 Democrats stand on gun control

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How small businesses got stiffed by the coronavirus pandemic

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The story of American businesses in the coronavirus pandemic is a tale of two markets — one made up of tech firms and online retailers as winners awash in capital, and another of brick-and-mortar mom-and-pop shops that is collapsing.

Why it matters: The coronavirus pandemic has created an environment where losing industries like traditional retail and hospitality as well as a sizable portion of firms owned by women, immigrants and people of color are wiped out and may be gone for good.

Apple's antitrust fight turns Epic

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Millions of angry gamers may soon join the chorus of voices calling for an antitrust crackdown on Apple, as the iPhone giant faces a new lawsuit and PR blitz from Epic Games, maker of mega-hit Fortnite.

Why it matters: Apple is one of several Big Tech firms accused of violating the spirit, if not the letter, of antitrust law. A high-profile lawsuit could become a roadmap for either building a case against tech titans under existing antitrust laws or writing new ones better suited to the digital economy.

Survey: Fears grow about Social Security’s future

Data: AARP survey of 1,441 U.S. adults conducted July 14–27, 2020 a ±3.4% margin of error at the 95% confidence level; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

Younger Americans are increasingly concerned that Social Security won't be enough to wholly fall back on once they retire, according to a survey conducted by AARP — in honor of today's 85th anniversary of the program — given first to Axios.

Why it matters: Young people's concerns about financial insecurity once they're on a restricted income are rising — and that generation is worried the program, which currently pays out to 65 million beneficiaries, won't be enough to sustain them.