Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

Sen. Bernie Sanders on Monday released 10 years of his tax returns, fulfilling his promise to release the long-awaited disclosure on Tax Day. The filings show he has made $1.7 million in the two years after running for president.

"These tax returns show that our family has been fortunate. I am very grateful for that, as I grew up in a family that lived paycheck to paycheck and I know the stress of economic insecurity. That is why I strive every day to ensure every American has the basic necessities of life, including a livable wage, decent housing, health care and retirement security."
"I consider paying more in taxes as my income rose to be both an obligation and an investment in our country.  I will continue to fight to make our tax system more progressive so that our country has the resources to guarantee the American Dream to all people."

By the numbers: Sanders' adjusted gross income over the last 10 years...

  • 2009: $314,742
  • 2010: $321,596
  • 2011: $324,870
  • 2012: $280,954
  • 2013: $278,799
  • 2014: $205,271
  • 2015: $240,622
  • 2016: $1,062,626
  • 2017: $1,131,925
  • 2018: $561,293

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