Expand chart
Data: NewsWhip; Chart: Chris Canipe/Axios — Note: Hover over the weekly rank on desktop to see articles and interactions for each candidate and issues.

For the second straight week, Bernie Sanders has hit the high watermark for online attention in the Democratic primary, according to data from NewsWhip provided exclusively to Axios.

Why it matters: It's not just quantity. The sentiment of the top stories about Sanders has been more positive than his top Democratic rivals — particularly Michael Bloomberg, whose recent online attention has been overwhelmingly negative.

By the numbers: Stories about Sanders generated 24 million interactions (likes, comments, shares) on social media last week — up from last week's 19.5 million, which was the previous high in the primary.

Yes, but: While Sanders has soared to new heights in the Democratic primary, his numbers still don't come close to Trump, who generated 64 million interactions last week — which wasn't particularly newsy by Trump standards.

Between the lines: While the top story about Sanders was the Washington Post's report that he was briefed that Russia was working to support his campaign, the next 13 biggest stories reflected positively on Sanders. They include:

  • Five pieces touting Sanders' success following the Nevada caucuses.
  • Three pieces math-checking a viral right-wing post that incorrectly represented his proposed tax rates.
  • Two items hawking Sanders' support from celebrities over 70 — Neil Young and Dick Van Dyke.

Bloomberg has also seen his interaction numbers skyrocket, quadrupling since the beginning of the month — but the sentiment has been overwhelmingly negative.

  • Whereas 13 of Bernie's 15 biggest stories reflected positively, 13 of the 15 biggest Bloomberg stories reflected negatively. Many of them centered on comments Bloomberg made in the past — both from right-wing publishers and from liberal media outlets.

Our 2020 attention tracker is based on data from NewsWhip exclusively provided to Axios as part of a project that will regularly update throughout the 2020 campaign.

See all past editions of the tracker here.

Go deeper

Updated 3 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12 p.m. ET: 12,772,755 — Total deaths: 566,036 — Total recoveries — 7,030,749Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12 p.m. ET: 3,269,531 — Total deaths: 134,898 — Total recoveries: 995,576 — Total tested: 39,553,395Map.
  3. Politics: Trump wears face mask in public for first time.
  4. States: Florida smashes single-day record for new coronavirus cases with over 15,000.
  5. Public health: Trump's coronavirus testing czar says lockdowns in hotspots "should be on the table" — We're losing the war on the coronavirus.
  6. Education: Betsy DeVos says schools that don't reopen shouldn't get federal funds — Pelosi accuses Trump of "messing with the health of our children."
34 mins ago - Health

Florida smashes single-day record for new coronavirus cases

Data: Covid Tracking Project; Chart: Axios Visuals

Florida reported 15,299 confirmed coronavirus cases on Sunday — a new single-day record for any state, according to its health department.

The big picture: The figure shatters both Florida's previous record of 11,458 new cases and the single-state record of 11,694 set by California last week, according to AP. It also surpasses New York's daily peak of 11,571 new cases in April, and comes just a day after Disney World reopened in Orlando.

Pelosi: Trump is "messing with the health of our children" with push to open schools

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday that Education Secretary Betsy DeVos' aggressive push to fully reopen schools this fall is "malfeasance and dereliction of duty," accusing the Trump administration of "messing with the health of our children."

Why it matters: Trump has demanded that schools reopen as part of his efforts to juice the economy by allowing parents to return to work, despite caution from health officials that little is known about how the virus impacts children.