Photo: Scott Eisen/Getty Images

Bernie Sanders said he "misspoke" on Wednesday after suggesting he planned to slow his presidential campaign down following a heart attack and medical procedure, instead promising to get back to a "very vigorous campaign," NBC reports.

"I said a word I should not have said and media drives me a little bit nuts to make a big deal about it.”
— Bernie Sanders

The state of play: Sanders underwent a medical procedure last Friday after doctors found a blockage in one of his arteries. Despite his condition, Sanders told reporters he plans on publicly releasing his medical records and will participate in the Oct. 15 Democratic primary debate.

  • Sanders said on Tuesday that he plans to "slow down his pace on the campaign trail" after his heart attack, the New York Times reported. He "acknowledged that voters would likely consider his health when deciding whether to support him."

Go deeper: Bernie Sanders released from hospital following heart attack

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California to independently review FDA-approved coronavirus vaccines

California Gov. Gavin Newsom. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

California will "independently review" all coronavirus vaccines approved by the Food and Drug Administration before allowing their distribution, Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) announced at a news conference Monday.

Why it matters: The move that comes days after NAID director Anthony Fauci said he had "strong confidence" in FDA-approved vaccines could cast further public doubt that the federal government could release a vaccine based on political motives, rather than safety and efficacy.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Politics: Trump says if Biden's elected, "he'll listen to the scientists"Trump calls Fauci a "disaster" on campaign call.
  2. Health: Coronavirus hospitalizations are on the rise — 8 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week.
  3. States: Wisconsin judge reimposes capacity limit on indoor venues.
  4. Media: Trump attacks CNN as "dumb b*stards" for continuing to cover pandemic.
  5. Business: Consumer confidence surveys show Americans are getting nervousHow China's economy bounced back from coronavirus.
  6. Sports: We've entered the era of limited fan attendance.
  7. Education: Why education technology can’t save remote learning.
Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Microphones will be muted during parts of Thursday's presidential debate

Photos: Jim Watson and Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The Commission on Presidential Debates adopted new measures on Monday to mute the microphones of President Trump and Joe Biden to allow each candidate two minutes of uninterrupted time per segment during Thursday night's debate.

Why it matters: During September's chaotic debate, Trump interrupted Biden 71 times, while Biden interrupted Trump 22 times.