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Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) attends a rally for then-congressional Democratic candidate Ayanna Pressley on Sept. 9, 2018. Photo: Scott Eisen/Getty Images

Rep. Ayanna Pressley (D-Mass.) announced Wednesday that she is endorsing Sen. Elizabeth Warren for president, breaking ranks with other members of "the Squad," a group of four progressive first-term Democratic congresswomen.

Why it matters: The backing marks one of Warren's highest-profile endorsements, though it's not a huge surprise as the two previously campaigned together while running for Senate and the House in Massachusetts last year. The other members of the Squad — Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) and Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.) — endorsed Sen. Bernie Sanders last month.

What she's saying:

"You've all heard about the senator's plans but here's the thing: The plans are about power, who has it, who refuses to let it go, and who deserves more of it. For Elizabeth and for me, power belongs in the hands of the people. That's why she's fighting for fundamental change that restores power to those who've been left behind, and centers those who've never had access to it in the first place."
— Ayanna Pressley in a video

Between the lines: The New York Times' Astead Herndon notes that Pressley was a surrogate for Hillary Clinton in 2016 and was never as tied to Sanders as the other members of the Squad. He argues that this endorsement is about Massachusetts and will "aid speculation that Pressley is heir apparent for Warren's Senate seat."

Go deeper: The Warren-Sanders turning point

Go deeper

Republicans pledge to set aside differences and work with Biden

President Biden speaks to Sen. Mitch McConnell after being sworn in at the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. Photo: Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty Images

Several Republicans praised President Biden's calls for unity during his inaugural address on Wednesday and pledged to work together for the benefit of the American people.

Why it matters: The Democrats only have a slim majority in the Senate and Biden will likely need to work with the GOP to pass his legislative agenda.

The Biden protection plan

Joe Biden announces his first run for the presidency in June 1987. Photo: Howard L. Sachs/CNP/Getty Images

The Joe Biden who became the 46th president on Wednesday isn't the same blabbermouth who failed in 1988 and 2008.

Why it matters: Biden now heeds guidance about staying on task with speeches and no longer worries a gaffe or two will cost him an election. His staff also limits the places where he speaks freely and off the cuff. This Biden protective bubble will only tighten in the months ahead, aides tell Axios.

Bush labels Clyburn the “savior” for Democrats

House Majority Whip James Clyburn takes a selfie Wednesday with former President George W. Bush. Photo: Patrick Semansky-Pool/Getty Images

Former President George W. Bush credited Rep. James Clyburn with being the "savior" of the Democratic Party, telling the South Carolinian at Wednesday's inauguration his endorsement allowed Joe Biden to win the party's presidential nomination.

Why it matters: The nation's last two-term Republican president also said Clyburn's nod allowed for the transfer of power, because he felt only Biden had the ability to unseat President Trump.