Stories by Drew Altman, Kaiser Family Foundation

For low-income people, employer health coverage is worse than ACA

Illustration of heart monitor charting health care costs
Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

There has been appropriate handwringing since 2010 about the affordability of Affordable Care Act plans in the marketplaces. But new data show that health insurance is decidedly less affordable for lower income people who get coverage at work than for their counterparts with similar incomes in the marketplaces.

Why it matters: It’s another example of how, when we focus so much on the ACA markets, we lose sight of problems in the employer-based health system where far more people get their coverage. For lower-wage workers, their coverage is decidedly worse than ACA coverage is.

Trump is reading the GOP base wrong on the Affordable Care Act


Data: Kaiser Health Tracking poll conducted Nov. 14-19, 2018, among 1,201 U.S. adults. Total margin of error is ±3.0 percentage points. Poll methodology; Chart: Chris Canipe

The only plausible explanation for President Trump's renewed effort through the courts to do away with the Affordable Care Act, other than muscle memory, is a desire to play to his base despite widely reported misgivings in his own administration and among Republicans in Congress.

Reality check: But the Republican base has more complicated views about the ACA than the activists who show up at rallies and cheer when the president talks about repealing the law. The polling is clear: Republicans don't like the ACA, but just like everyone else, they like its benefits and will not want to lose them.

The winning health care message will be about out of pocket costs

Illustration of a wallet full of band-aids
Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

As the 2020 campaign ramps up, Democrats may be able to rally their base by talking about universal coverage and making health care a right through Medicare-for-all. Republicans may be able to motivate their core voters by branding progressive Democratic ideas as socialism.

The catch: But it’s the candidates who can connect their plans and messages to voters’ worries about out of pocket costs who will reach beyond the activists in their base. And the candidates aren’t speaking to that much, at least so far.